The pricier second generation binoculars are less common compared to first generation binoculars, the reason being that they are about $500 pricier than first generation devices. For the added cost, second generation binoculars come fitted with an electron amplifier known as a micro-channel plate. Abbreviated as MCP, this plate increases the light amplification power of second generation binoculars. As such, second generation devices produce sharper and brighter images.

I too am shopping for a pair of binoculars for my husband for Christmas. We live in a condominium building overlooking Lake Superior and he likes to look at the cargo ships coming in and out and the different boats on the water. I am thinking something 10x or 10-30x. We would probably just keep it mounted on a tripod if I bought a heavier set, but would prefer something lighter. 


Also, unlike every other model we tested (except the Nikon Prostaff compacts), the Pentax AD’s fasteners for the straps are located between the eyepieces, not along the sides of the body where they poke into your thumbs as you focus. Of course, this meant the straps tend to get in the way a bit whenever you lift the binoculars to your eyes, but this was a minor inconvenience rather than a dealbreaker. The rubberized eyepieces of the Pentax AD also felt comfortable against my eyes and are also less prone to temperature fluctuations in the field, so you won’t freeze when the weather is cold.

Speaking of durability, you’ll want to closely examine it inside and out. You’ll want to know whether or not the monocular is waterproof and/or shockproof, and whether or not the chamber of the optics is nitrogen-filled to prevent fogging. It might also be useful to know about the warranty, since some high end models can provide fantastic warranties that even give you your full purchase price back if you are not totally satisfied with your purchase.


Back in the clarity section, we talked about how alignment can affect the detail you see through a pair of binoculars. Some alignment issues can be hard to diagnose. Small alignment issues can only show up with specially calibrated equipment. One can look at the overall construction quality and hope that if they follow tight tolerances on the rest of the production, then optics should follow suit.
Pro Tip: Hunters, birders, and astronomers should keep the magnifications at 8x and below and boost the objectives up over 50mm to produce wide exit pupils, such as this pair of 8x56 from Steiner. I used this specific pair in the middle of the night and they could completely cover my pupils, which boosted my ability to see, despite the dark surroundings (You can read my review of them here if you want to know more). Boaters should also consider this type of configuration because the wide exit pupil will help to minimize the disorientation that is common when viewing through binoculars on pitching or rolling water.

Your binoculars' basic performance is decided by three factors: Magnification, the size of the objective lenses (the lenses furthest from your eyes, on the "front" of the binoculars), and lens quality. Every pair of binoculars is labeled with numbers that show the magnification and lens size, with magnification coming first. A set of 8x42 binoculars, for example, makes objects or animals appear eight times closer -- the first number -- and has an objective lens size of 42mm. If you're shopping for binoculars in person, "8x42" is pronounced "eight by forty-two."

Whether you're a high-stakes hunter or a devoted birdwatcher, SCHEELS has the right pair of binoculars for you. We offer a high-quality selection of leading name-brand binoculars designed by optics innovators such as Nikon, Vortex, Swarovski, Leupold, Bushnell, and many more. We also offer a range of our own SCHEELS Outfitters binoculars that provide extremely sharp, clear vision and are a top choice among outdoor enthusiasts.
First Generation Night Vision Units: First-generation units are the most common type of night vision binoculars, and they're used by everyone from wildlife enthusiasts to people interested in home security. They can amplify ambient light by a factor of several thousand, which enables users to clearly view nighttime images. When using these binoculars, people may notice some geometric distortion wherein the images are slightly blurred. This is standard for this generation of night vision goggles.
You seriously can’t beat the price of this awesome toy! They’re a great first option to give your kids the feel of high-end binoculars while still providing some kid features that are necessary for a younger age group. These come with an eight-times zoom which is great for seeing far-away distances up to a thousand feet with no problem. The viewing lenses themselves are also fitted with a roof prism and multi-coated fiber optics for a super clear and concise picture. If the picture needs to be adjusted even that is made easier by a “center-focus” knob that’s easy and precise. The ease of use translates well to a child’s level which can often be complicated to explain to those who have never used a magnification device before. The cool thing about SkyGenius is their use of eco-friendly materials to create their stellar products that are customized specifically for kids, even down to the rubber grips that make them easier for a child to handle on their own without dropping or slipping and the rubber eyepieces that increase comfortability. BENEFITS When you’re looking for a fun activity to do outdoors with your kids without breaking the bank, consider the SkyGenius binoculars. They’re efficient, powerful, durable, and are perfect for beginners. Pros
Our runner-up, the Celestron TrailSeeker 8x42s, have rugged, armored construction and were among the lightest binoculars we tested, at 23 ounces (the Athlons weigh two ounces more). Celestron has been making high-quality consumer telescopes since the 1960s, but also offers a huge line of binoculars (over 14 lines, and more than 30 different models).
Close focus refers to the closest distance at which a pair of bins can clearly focus on something. This is a less important consideration as even the worst bins have a close focus range of 15 feet, and the vast majority of things you'll be looking at will be farther away. However, a closer focus range does allow you to be a bit more curious. For instance, a closer focus range lets you get an incredibly detailed look at a butterfly that landed in the bush right in front of you. About the best close focus range you can find is 4.5 feet, meaning most people would be able to focus on a bug that landed on their foot.
We spent weeks with this field of binoculars, using them the way you do: by strapping them to our chests and hiking all sorts of terrain. We also rated the optics on their ability to serve a hunter or shooter, which meant putting an emphasis on their durability, and versatility. Since optics are designed to help us see, we also scored image sharpness and cleanness on a standard resolution chart, and then tested their low-light visibility in the evenings. Here are the results.
The Avalon 10×42 monocular reviewed in this post will be very suitable for reading the chalk board in class. You can test a-bit to see which eye will work best and adjust the twistable eyecup as well. This will make sure you are getting the best possible image on every use. The lightweight and single handed operation of this monocular is also very handy for prolong viewing. The only downside is that you’ll need to sit at least 3 to 4 meters away from the chalk board in order to achieve a focused image. Critical. But this is the same requirement with any other monocular or binoculars. The Avalon 10×42 actually outperforms other models in this sense as you can be only 3-4 meters close to your subject and still focus perfectly. Details of the monocular below: https://procular.com.au/avalon-10×42-wp-monocular/

Barska’s Colorado scope is a nice place to start. With a straight-viewing zoom eyepiece that offers a broad 15-40x magnification range and a respectable 50mm objective, this one sports a simple tabletop tripod that can be set up on the hood of a car, a tailgate, or picnic table. Weighing less than a pound, kids will find it easy to use and it won’t take up a lot of space. Moving up a little, FireField’s 20x50 spotting scope also has a tabletop tripod, but with a fixed magnification, so using it is a bit easier without zoom rings to worry about, and it is water- and fog-proof. If the weather turns, the optic will be fine. In contrast to these two straight-viewing models, Celestron’s LandScout series has an angled view, which might be more comfortable when it’s set up on a table. What I particularly like about this one is that it has a large focusing collar, comfy for small hands. The LandScouts come in two sizes: a 10-30x50 and a larger 12-36x60 version, both for less than $50. Another great option is this Sightmark kit: you get a 15-45x60 spotter with a tabletop tripod, hard and soft cases, plus a filter set, all for less than $100. Looking at offerings with full-sized tripod, Celestron’s LandScout, as discussed above (both the 50mm and 60mm), are offered with adjustable-height aluminum tripods, a three-way head, and a backpack in which everything fits.
We are defining clarity as the amount of detail one can see through the lenses. This was tested by using the following ISO 12233 chart. The chart was downloaded and printed on a piece of 11x17 paper at 1200 dpi resolution. We also recruited a couple bird models from a local arts and crafts store (Garry the Goldfinch and Barry the Bluebird) and observed those models through each pair of binoculars.
A. It depends on a variety of factors, such as what generation your equipment is and how the size of the item that you’re looking for. Keep in mind that you may be able to observe an item but not necessarily know what it is, such as seeing a person at a distance, but not knowing if it’s a man or woman until they get closer. That’s the difference between detection range and observation range. In most cases, the higher generation device you use, the farther away you’ll be able to spot things.
Highlights included the very precise and positive pull-to-turn center-knob diopter adjustment and the oversized focus wheel. We also liked the 6-foot close-focus, which was one of the leaders in the small-frame class. Misses: the extremely shallow focal plane, indistinct positions of the 2-stage eyecups, and the BX-4’s significant weight. With the mid-barrel hinge, it’s hard to operate the Leupold with a single hand.
Vanguard’s Spirit ED binoculars are very worthy of mention in this section. They come in four sizes: 8X36, 8X42, 10X42, and 10X50. The 10X42 pair have a 314 ft. field of view and 16 mm eye relief. Like its counterparts in this section, these binoculars are waterproof, fog proof, and have coated lenses. They weigh a bit more than the other binoculars in this section at 29.8 ounces.
These binoculars are described as perfect for kids and while this is true the blue color does lend itself to boys more than girls. The IClarity binoculars are well put together; the sides are black while the midsection and the hinges are all blue.  The focus well is well positioned in the center of the body and is also black, creating a nice contrast. The main body is encased in metal to provide plenty of protection against bumps, scrapes and even accidental drops. The eyepieces are surrounded with soft rubber to ensure your child is comfortable and safe when they push the binoculars against their eyes. The hinges easily move the individual sides to ensure they form the perfect position for your child’s eyes. These binoculars come with a soft nylon carry case to help protect them. There is also a 2-foot long neck cord which is easily attached to the binoculars. You also benefit from a soft lens cleaning cloth and a one-year replacement guarantee to cover any non-fault damage. You also benefit from a 30-day money back guarantee if you are unsatisfied with the product for any reason!
Out of the package, kid’s binoculars are projected to be durable. They can take a reasonable amount of mutilation to the non-optical portions and still have years of life left in them which we believe is great considering the fact the binoculars are meant for kids. Weather and water resistance was important for the lasting life of the binoculars, so we gave points to only the binoculars that lay emphasis on this point with greater protection. We also looked at the optical portions too, which could be broken if the binoculars didn’t consist of some protection.
Nikon's black 10x42 ProStaff 3S Binocular (B&H # NIPS3S10X42) features silver-alloy coated roof prisms and anti-reflection multi-coated optics that produces bright and clear high-contrast images with true color rendition across its entire field of view. To help offset visible hand-shake often associated with 10x power and higher optics, Nikon built this binocular with a wide 63° apparent angle of view to limit disorientation and improve the observational experience in most lighting conditions, and even in the most extreme weather. Whether you're hunting or birding, boating or watching your favorite team, this ProStaff will quickly become indispensable for all you're outdoor activities.
This is a really great monocular. It is very easy to use daytime or nighttime. I'm very pleased with the quality. The reviewers were right with the exception of one. They said I can see the stars, planets, moon etc up close. I bought it because I didn't want a telescope to lug around. You can see the moon pretty well but it doesn't magnify the stars, planets to get any detail. I am a newby at this so I did look at quite a bit of monoculars and reviews on Amazon. By far this is the best one. Even though I can't see the stars and planets up close with detail I am still very pleased and happy I purchased it. Amazing night vision!

The Avalon 10×42 monocular reviewed in this post will be very suitable for reading the chalk board in class. You can test a-bit to see which eye will work best and adjust the twistable eyecup as well. This will make sure you are getting the best possible image on every use. The lightweight and single handed operation of this monocular is also very handy for prolong viewing. The only downside is that you’ll need to sit at least 3 to 4 meters away from the chalk board in order to achieve a focused image. Critical. But this is the same requirement with any other monocular or binoculars. The Avalon 10×42 actually outperforms other models in this sense as you can be only 3-4 meters close to your subject and still focus perfectly. Details of the monocular below: https://procular.com.au/avalon-10×42-wp-monocular/
A compact powerhouse, this 10-power bino has decent glass inside a package that whispers “backcountry,” owing to its Sitka Subalpine camo treatment and small chassis. The Pro Guide HD comes with some great features, including a premium carry strap and nylon case. But at 17 ounces, it’s a handful, and the test team felt that the better magnification for the frame size is 8X (which Leupold makes in this model; the 10X version was submitted for our test).

Binoculars are very popular, but a good monocular has a number of advantages, not least of which is giving you the same optical power for less money. There are hundreds of monoculars available from dozens of manufacturers – from models as small as your thumb to others a foot long or more. Monoculars come with a range of different functions and features, and technical terms that are specific to optical devices can sometimes cause confusion.


I’ve been birding since grade school and have spent the past 20 years working as a professional ornithologist, traveling worldwide to look for and learn about birds. I’ve published a couple dozen scientific papers and wrote Important Bird Areas of California, published in 2004 by Audubon California. Professionally, I lead birding trips for both beginners and experts, and for my “day job” I perform environmental surveys for individuals, conservation groups, corporations, and government agencies.
The human eye is confined to a small portion of visible light which is referred to as the electromagnetic spectrum. A night vision binocular helps you see better in low-lit situations by enhancing the nonvisible source of electromagnetic radiation. It does this using infrared illuminators, which shine a beam of infrared light which can then be picked up by the binocular optics. Before purchasing night vision binoculars, ensure that they have IR illuminators, which makes them suitable for use even in areas with low ambient light or complete darkness.
Bushnell is a giant in imaging products in the United States, and it makes everything from high quality rifle scopes, microscopes, telescopes, and of course, binoculars. The company was founded in Japan by David P. Bushnell when it was occupied by Allied forces during WWII in 1948. Bushnell’s binoculars have won multiple awards for their quality, and most recently, the Bushnell Legend Ultra HD 10X42 binoculars were awarded binocular of the year by binoculars.com.
These binoculars worked great in total darkness however we did notice that in even remote lighted areas your vision using the binoculars is greatly reduced. The key is the darker it is, the better vision we found. These are 5 power and while than may not seem like a lot we found it to be more than adequate. Most of out subjects were less that 50 feet and we got great views at that distance. You can stretch the distance some however the quality of the subject begins to lesson.

The available light from a scene enters the binoculars through the objective lenses. This light is composed of photons in all colors. The photons hit a light-sensitive surface called photocathode and are converted into electrons. A photomultiplier amplifies these electrons. On their way out, the multiplied electrons hit a phosphor screen producing flashes of light and emitting a visible image. The protons emitted are more than the ones that entered through the lens and the scene in focus appears brighter and clearer.


I would like to draw your attention to the Tom Lock 10x42 Series 2 binocular, that ran the Carson very close and with a BBR score of 70%, would have been right up there with last years winner and which is why I feel that they are well worth a mention and urge you to take a closer look at if you are after a slightly higher powered, but low cost 10x device.
These are right in the middle of the price chart for kids binoculars, which is pretty nice for these and everything that comes with them. They’ve got nice magnification and nice durability for a pretty low price. Parents will also appreciate the low price for the effective use of the binoculars making them ideal for little kids that want to start off.
For more options, you can look at conventional microscopes. The perfect starter set comes from iOptron, with an 84-piece kit that comes with a hard carrying case for most of the gear. Kunuscience has a kit that includes a 100x to 1200x microscope with a projector accessory, blank and prepared slides, and a hard carrying case. Celestron has a model that comes with a 2MP eyepiece camera that sends images to a computer, and Carson has one that comes with a universal smartphone adapter, so you can use them as conventional microscopes while still having the ability to digitally store images, edit them, and share them.
Hi, Actually im new to this. i found that Bushnell 16x52mm Monocular is quite value of money and it is also quite powerful specs that have 16x zoom on 52mm. but when i searched on the bushnell website,the monocular did not exist anymore. is it because of the model is too old? i could not find much information on this binocular and asking for some advice. thankyou
Bought these for my son since they looked like they would be a more substantial pair of binocolulars than some cheap bright colored kids kind, boy was I wrong. First the magnification is no better than just using a magnifying glass, then they subsequently broke 2 months after we purchase them and are not fixable. Get a real pair of binoculars because these a not worth it.

When Sarah, the owner of Kidwinz, sent a follow-up email to check on the purchase, I thought I should write and let her know what happened. She responded within a day, apologized profusely, and said that perhaps the binoculars we got were damaged at the warehouse. She assured me they were drop tested and this rarely happens, and she offered to send us another pair free of charge. I thanked her, gave her my address, and within a couple of days a new pair of binoculars arrived.
The Bushnell 260501 Equinox Night Vision is powered by 4 AA batteries. The advantage of these batteries is that they are available in local stores in most areas. The batteries are not costly and you can decide to get lithium or any other type that you deem fit. Take note the quality of batteries will affect how often you replace them. If you are going to use the device for extended periods of time, it would be advisable to carry an extra pair. People who have used the binoculars have stated that it can run for approximately 3 hours when it is using batteries. This means that you need at least two pairs if you are going to be using the binoculars for more than 3 hours. Though the device is quite pricey, its features are worth the investment.
You will love the viewing experience during the day. The 10X magnification power works extremely well for daylight viewing but reduces the clarity in low light conditions. With weak light, the performance is decent. The 40mm aspherical lenses have a multi-layer coating to improve light gain and deliver bright and high contrast images in low light conditions. They have a large field of view and are easy to adjust to fit your eyes and to focus when viewing objects from a distance. In total darkness, these are not night vision and won't work.

Another feature we deemed essential was proper functioning for users with glasses. Your binoculars work only when the proper distance between your eye and the binoculars’ ocular lens (the lens on the eyepiece end) is maintained. Glasses would increase that distance if you didn’t have a way to adjust the inboard or outboard position of the ocular lens. This feature is called eye relief, and the standard recommendation is that those who wear glasses need a minimum of 15 mm of adjustability. Old-fashioned eye relief meant a pair of rubber cups that rolled down to bring your glasses to the proper distance; those cups are still found on some binoculars, but we don’t recommend them, because they’ll eventually stiffen or even tear. Preferable are eyepieces that twist downward into a more compact position, a feature that all of our picks have.

BESPIN believes that children should be given real binoculars, not toys, so they can really enjoy the many wonders of the great outdoors as well as fast-paced and high-adrenaline activities like sports. They may have a point. If you get a toy, even though it’s classified as the best ones, there’s a great chance your child might simply miss out on the real fun of the real world. That’s why BESPIN developed the high resolution 8x21 Binoculars Set that features a blue-coated Bk-7 prism optics which greatly enhances the clarity and high quality resolution of the images seen through the eyepiece and lens. Adding to the superb viewing quality of its glass is the 7.2-degree viewing angle which greatly expands the visual field. Whereas other binocs will obstruct the peripheries, the BESPIN allows kids to view the scene more like a panorama. Focusing the lens is made super easy with the centrally located focus ring. The ergonomic design of the body is also very handy as it fits right on the small hands of kids. It’s not made of cheap plastic but rather high grade aluminum giving it a classier and more deluxe feel. Protecting the body and the delicate glass inside is a rubber armor that effectively absorbs sudden impact forces so these are not transmitted to the core. With such attention to detail, the BESPIN easily bests other binocs.
Most of these binoculars work through a combination of image enhancement technology and amplification. The front lens gathers the available ambient light and infrared radiation and then sends it to a photocathode tube. Here, photons are turned into electrons, which can be amplified and made visible. This manifests as a green-hued image that users can view through the eye piece. Some night vision technology may also use thermal imaging.
For those that are looking to invest in a quality pair of optics, we've found that the Vortex Viper HD 8x42 offers the best balance of performance and price. These bins provide high-quality glass that created some of the brightest and clearest images we came across in our testing. In fact, the only models that bested the Viper HD in our image quality testing were those that cost more than $2000. These bins are also comfortable in hand, have a nice supple focus knob, boast a 6.5-foot close focus range, and are somewhat on the lighter side for a full-sized pair optics.
If you’re looking for a pair of binoculars that can be used in all kinds of lighting conditions, the Orion Scenix 7x50 is a great option. It has porro prisms made from BAK-4 optical glass for sharp, clear views, plus, Orion has coated the entire inside with anti-reflective coating so you get the brightest, truest images through the lens. This makes it a great model for nighttime and astronomical viewing, as well as for daytime use in full sunlight. Whether you’re looking to stargaze or birdwatch, the Scenix has you covered.
The flared eye-cups are an obvious example. They do an excellent job of blocking out distractions and light from the periphery of your view and thus offer a far more immersive and indeed better view. This is especially true in situations where you may have the sun shining brightly from the side as there is no glare on the eye-piece lens as you would get with almost any other instrument. As they are so effective and seemingly easy to implement, it is really surprising to me that this fantastic, but small feature is not found on more optics.
You will love the viewing experience during the day. The 10X magnification power works extremely well for daylight viewing but reduces the clarity in low light conditions. With weak light, the performance is decent. The 40mm aspherical lenses have a multi-layer coating to improve light gain and deliver bright and high contrast images in low light conditions. They have a large field of view and are easy to adjust to fit your eyes and to focus when viewing objects from a distance. In total darkness, these are not night vision and won't work.

If you're looking for the absolute best optical quality on the market in a pair of bins likely to become a family heirloom, the Swarovski EL 8.5x42 is the best choice. These binoculars outdid the other premium models in our testing, offering both better image quality and superior comfort. What sets the EL apart is the ability to maintain perfect clarity across the entirety of the image, whereas most models present some blurring at the edges. This creates an incredibly immersive image that makes you feel like you're sitting just a few feet away from that Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

We assume you are after a compact handheld monocular and not a spotting scope (i.e. tripod mounted but more powerful). If this is the case then there are a few good options. The MOST important thing to know is that there are a-lot of compact monoculars out there that are nearly impossible to use. Even if the specs look good they might have an objective sense that is too small or even worst a too narrow field of view. This makes them very hard to locate your subject with and achieve a clear image. Most 8×25 or 10×25 monoculars are simply too small for surveillance. Even 10×30 will also be too small for this. You should opt for at least 10×36 or 10×42 monoculars. This size of objective lens (36mm or 42mm) gives you a much better view than any 10×30 monocular. Note that these monoculars will still be compact, just feature a slightly larger lens. This does makes a big difference. The Avalon 10×42 monocular reviewed in the post above is a very good one as it has good power (10x) and a nice 42mm lens. It is still compact, lightweight and very durable. Details below:
Fluoride glass is one of the secrets to the Zeiss Victory’s premium imagery, ensuring that every sight seen through these lens is of the best quality possible. A 45 millimeter objective lens adds to sight quality while the field of view remains one of the best in its class. Though slightly heavier than other comparable binoculars, the Zeiss Victory makes up for it with convenient button placement for added comfort.

Lens quality is a little harder to gauge, although the clarity and precision of your binoculars' lenses really is the ultimate arbiter of their performance. Price is typically a good indicator, and advances in optic technology mean you can now get top-notch performance -- or very close to it -- for less than $1,000. Key features that indicate good optics include fully multicoated lenses (which help the binoculars gather more light), ED or HD glass to do the same, and either dielectric coated roof prisms or high-quality porro prisms (which do not need to be coated). The best binoculars in all price ranges are also fully waterproof and nitrogen- or argon-purged (that is, filled with nitrogen or argon instead of air) to keep the lenses from fogging up.

These binoculars can be bought for between $30 and $40 which makes them one of the most expensive options available. However, the quality of the product and the image clarity makes them an extremely worthwhile investment. This is borne out by an 86 review rating of 4 stars and above. In fact, there was only one 1 star review! As no manufacturer can get it perfect every time, this is a good indication of the quality of these binoculars. This is also the reason why they are on the best kids binoculars review list. It is important to note that the weight and size of these binoculars and their functions means this is suitable for older children, (over 7) rather than young kids.


We’re back to binoculars that are more in the realm of toys for kids than for any real finding. And with that, you might want to use your discretion on what is actually going to work. These have rubberized lenses and 4x magnification as well as some other nice aspects for kids, but you’ll want to compare them to the other binoculars for young kids on this list. With that said, let’s talk about the Haba Terra Kids Binoculars and how they compare to other binoculars on this list.
Magnification sizes typically run from 6x to 12x, although you'll sometimes find binoculars with magnification powers of 20x or more. The sweet spot for most uses is 8x magnification; it gives good detail, but doesn't magnify things so much that the normal movement of your hand produces a shaky image. Birders or hunters who have very steady hands or routinely use a tripod will sometimes go as high as 10x or 12x magnification to better spot soaring raptors or count points on a distant buck, but rarely more.
The world of binoculars is vast and constantly evolving. No matter what you’re using them for—from a night at the opera to hunting on the tundra to comet watching—there is something for everyone at every price. This article has offered a basic introduction to the terms and technologies that will affect your buying decision and the overall performance of the optic. After making your selection, don’t forget about the accessories that can enhance your viewing experience and turn a good view into a great view.
(Close your right eye and sight an object with your left eye, focus the binocular by rotating the center focus wheel until the image is sharp and clear. Field of vision: 96m/1000m 20x. Open your right eye and close your left eye, rotate the right eyepiece until the object sighted is sharp and clear(Note the setting of the diopter scale for later use).
Playing outdoors in nature has to be one of the best things for a young kid. There is something about the way that kids and nature at play together offers a never ending chance at discovering new and exciting things. These Kidnoculars get your kids outside and running for their next adventure they can be takin camping, hiking, and practically everywhere.
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The Night Owl Explorer comes with 5x magnification. That means one thing: a powerful view. To be exact, it has a 700 field of view and a 575 range of view. That’s remarkable for sight seeing and observing. With the built in infrared illuminators, you’re able to view the wildlife animals in absolute, complete darkness. The moon could be hidden from the night sky and you would be able to see what is many yards ahead of you. It has a steel stringer system that gives you additional control and precision over the binoculars.
There are binoculars designed specifically for civilian and military use at sea. Hand held models will be 5× to 7× but with very large prism sets combined with eyepieces designed to give generous eye relief. This optical combination prevents the image vignetting or going dark when the binoculars are pitching and vibrating relative to the viewer's eye. Large, high-magnification models with large objectives are also used in fixed mountings.
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