“These are quality binoculars. They are great for bird watching both in the national parks or open areas, and the mount helps you capture images that you would need an expensive DSLR camera to get a clear shot of so you can revisit the memories you have created. The optics are gorgeous. The image quality is comparable to the expensive brand like Bushnell. Very satisfied with the quality.”
The most difficult aspect of night vision binoculars is, of course, knowing which one’s to purchase and which to avoid. You can easily spend a ton of money and wind up with the best pair on the market, but higher cost doesn’t guarantee best quality. Like anything else, night vision binoculars have higher end models and lower end models, and it may come as a surprise, but some of the cheaper binoculars may be the best for your needs.
The Carson RD 8 x 26 waterproof, Levenhuk Karma Pro 8 x 25, Maven C.2 10 x 28, and Minox 8 x 25 are part of a slew of “new compact” binoculars that resemble shrunken-down versions of the full-size 8 x 42 models, but were about two-thirds the size and weight. At this size, though, they’re too large to slip into most pockets, unless you have a huge coat on, taking away the very portability that we were looking for. I also found the quality lacking across the board—eyepieces that wouldn’t stop spinning (Maven), eyecups that didn’t sit flush with the eye (Levenhuk, Minox), and distortion of distant objects (Carson).
ATN is a massive brand in the night vision and thermal imaging technological field. In case you’re interested, the letters, “ATN” stand for “American Technologies Network”. The company is headquartered in San Francisco, California, like the company Armasight, and has been in operation for over two decades. The company proudly states that all of their products and technological equipment is created and produced in the United States. Many hunters choose much of their night vision equipment from ATN and Armasight merely because they’re two huge brands that offer the most advanced products for a broad range of prices. If you want something simplistic, ATN has it. If you need something very developed with the high tech Gen 3 details, ATN has it. ATN’s products and cutting edge technologies are often used by the military, law enforcement communities, and hunters. See all ATN products.
Polycarbonate  Polycarbonate is a polymer resin that comes in many formulas with many different properties. In general, they all share similar characteristics, such as being easy to work with and inexpensive, corrosion proof, and strong. The principal advantage of using polycarbonate is that it is temperature resistant. If you’re using the optic in extreme conditions (especially cold) the chassis will remain at a neutral temperature—unlike metals, which can (and will) get cold, given enough time. More importantly, metal expands and contracts with temperature fluctuations, so over the years that constant movement can pull the optics out of columniation, which will prevent the optic from being able to achieve tack-sharp focus. Since polycarbonates won’t expand and contract, they are not subject to this possibility.
Resolution is a common term in any device that is used for viewing. The resolution affects the image quality of your night vision binoculars. Therefore, before buying one, you should take this into consideration. The higher the resolution on a device, the better the resulting image. Ideally, you should go for the highest resolution within your budget. It’s also important to note that resolution tends to deteriorate as you move from the center towards the edges of the image.
Also be aware, however, that the biggest monocular with the biggest magnification is not always the best choice. You must balance the optics against other features. For example, magnifications of 6 and 7 are often better for compact monoculars, because larger magnifications create shakiness in such a small device. Plus, compact monoculars will, by nature, have smaller lenses. Even larger monoculars with smaller lenses or magnifications can serve you well if they come with features such as multi-coated optics to maximize the clarity of the light coming through the lenses.

Though the slightly heavy design may seem inconvenient at first, the Vivitar Digicam Binoculars are well worth the effort with a 640X480 resolution on the attached camera. Add to that the 16 megabytes of internal storage and these camera binoculars become perfect for both long and short sightseeing events, from sports games to nature walks and more. Designed for comfort and precision, the Vivitar 10×25 carries a long battery life as well to ensure long-term use on almost any outing.


Another factor you must check is how a set of nighttime binoculars is powered. You want to choose one whose source of power is convenient for you and the battery life is long enough for your expeditions. A set that uses separate batteries means you can swap batteries if the current battery is depleted and continue with your observation but an onboard rechargeable battery is cost efficient in the long run. 

When it comes to shopping for the best night vision binoculars, you really need to know what you need. In order to figure this out, ask yourself, “What am I going to be using them for? How much is my budget? The lighter, the better? What will be my typical observation range?” Once you can answer these questions, then you can best determine what brand and price will best suit your needs. It always makes for easier shopping when you know exactly what you are searching for.
This might seem like an odd thing to consider, since the whole idea of a binocular is to look at things that are far away; and for most users this is absolutely true. However, there are a fair number of enthusiasts who use their binocular for bird watching or insect observation. Many bird watchers like to have a close minimum focus distance that can allow them to see minute detail of birds—like wing bars, beak shape, or crown markings—while birds are feeding. A close focus of less than 6' for a full-size binocular is noteworthy. Typically, as magnification is increased, the minimum focus distance also increases. For users interested in a short close-focus distance, they should look at larger objectives and keep the magnification at around 8x.
This is a worthy addition to Leica’s venerable Geovid line. The biggest update is a faster, more powerful laser that reaches out to 3,000 yards (though in practical terms, 2,000 yards is a more realistic expectation) and works in concert with a ballistics calculator that contains profiles for 12 standard loads. Users also have the option of uploading custom ballistics through a micro-SD port. No matter the data source, the nearly instantaneous readout gives users a shooting solution based on holdover, click adjustment, or incline-adjusted range informed by the onboard environmental sensors, including temperature, barometric pressure, and angle.

Thank you for your comment. As the distance is quite short (25 & 50 yards) you will not need too much magnification. But 10x should work best in order to see the small bullet holes more clearly. We recommend either the Avalon monocular reviewed in this post: https://procular.com.au/avalon-10×42-wp-monocular/ , or a pair of 10×25 compact binoculars if size is critical to you: https://procular.com.au/bushnell-10×25-h2o-compact-binoculars/
Familiar size – Since the visual angle of an object projected onto the retina decreases with distance, this information can be combined with previous knowledge of the objects size to determine the absolute depth of the object. For example, people are generally familiar with the size of an average automobile. This prior knowledge can be combined with information about the angle it subtends on the retina to determine the absolute depth of an automobile in a scene.
These are very nice kids binoculars, especially for the price! My daughter adores them. I wish there were a way to remove the cord that goes around their neck TEMPORARILY- It's nice for going bird watching, but I don't want to worry about my kids strangling themselves in the house. It doesn't have one of those break-free clips on it to prevent it.. so keep that in mind. Not a big deal if you're willing to cut it off.
​To be honest, the Binocularsus-BF6060 is not the best night vision binocular I own. Nevertheless, it is still a pretty decent night vision binocular to own, especially considering its price. For night vision viewing, the binocular uses HD LLL night vision technology but lacks an infrared illuminator. Therefore, it is not the best binocular to use in total darkness.
Optically, the TrailSeeker offered exceptional light-gathering abilities. I remember watching a northern harrier soaring against the sky and the colors of the streaks below were as sharp as can be. Another bonus is this pair’s ability to focus close—as near as 6.5 feet, with a field of view of 426 feet at 1,000 yards. However, the outer edges of that expansive field of view had some mild distortion. The streaks on a Lincoln’s sparrow got a little mushy through the edges of the Celestron lenses, yet remained razor-sharp through the lenses of the Athlon Optics Midas ED. Most users probably won’t notice this, but the Athlons were clearly superior, to my trained eye.
A lot of the discussion on the general internet tends to be one brand against another with very little reason as to why. Also most forum users only own one pair, so it very much becomes a sample-of-one. Your atricle puts all the main concepts together allowing the prospective buyer to at least understand all the jargon and also filtering out the marketing gumf which so often misleads (aircraft-grade, being a prime example).
This is an electronic tool with fragile components and you will be using it outdoors and at night. The likelihood that it will be exposed to water is high. This is especially if you will be using your set while fishing, boating or sailing or when it is raining. It is essential that it has an adequate measure of water resistance to enable it to withstand light splashes, exposure to dew, mist, sweat, and rain showers without it failing. 
The two images below are of my two and a half year old daughter showing off that she "can use my binoculars" and even one handed! However whilst these Hawke Nature-Trek 8x42 Open Hinge binoculars are particularly lightweight, I would not suggest getting them specifically for your child. What these pics do not show is how long she could hold them for or how steadily she was holding them!

Vortex Diamondback binoculars are of very high quality, and although the company is not as big as its competitors, it can deliver a great product. Diamondbacks come in 4 sizes: 8X28, 8X42, 10X42, and 12X50. The 10X42 pair have a 345 ft. field of view and 16 mm eye relief. These binoculars are waterproof, fog proof and have coated lenses. They weigh 24.4 ounces.


I’ve owned and used a pair of Bushnell bins for many years, and these are a hell of a lot cheaper than mine were a number of years back, yet they have the same decent 8x magnification power and a large 42mm diameter lens that soaks in plenty of light. Distant objects are bright and easy to see even in dim light when I have this pair of Bushnells raised to my eyes. The locking system also helps keep the ideal focal settings in place even when I jostle the hardware around, making the Legend L-Series great all-purpose binoculars for hunters, hikers, birders, and more.
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