Simply stated, binoculars use a series of lenses, elements, and prisms to produce a magnified view of distant people, places, or things. Using two parallel optical tubes allows you to observe with both eyes open, which is more comfortable and natural than using a spotting scope or telescope—which requires you to keep one eye closed. Additionally, having both eyes open maintains your depth of field and provides you with a rich and immersive experience where the scene takes on a more lifelike, 3-D appearance.
These are right in the middle of the price chart for kids binoculars, which is pretty nice for these and everything that comes with them. They’ve got nice magnification and nice durability for a pretty low price. Parents will also appreciate the low price for the effective use of the binoculars making them ideal for little kids that want to start off.
Basic isn’t always a bad thing, and sometimes all you want for your child is a good quality, fun product. In this case, it’s unnecessary to go all-out and buy a full-on kit filled with many different things that they may not always use. Sometimes, buying a single product is a better idea when you’re just trying to add to your child’s outdoor fun or ease them into the idea of adventuring outside. The DIMY binocular is a great way to do that with its great kid-themed design and quality that makes it a solid option for any age. Specifically, they are created in mind for young kids who may have a habit of dropping things or just have butterfingers. The entire outside is covered in a colorful rubber material that absorbs shock and prevents potential damage to the interior mechanics. In addition, they come in ten different colors, making them a wonderful gift for a girl or boy. The rubber exterior also improves grip and was designed to fit tiny child hands. The prism lenses are coated with green optics which helps to produce clear reflections and sharp images for kids viewing. Included with these bold-colored binoculars are a carrying case, lanyard, and lens cloth for easy cleaning. BENEFITS These binoculars are fun, colorful, and 100% kid-proof. That makes them a perfect starter gift or a good addition to an already growing collection of exploration tools. Pros
This is a compact yet incredibly stylish offering suitable for a boy or a girl. The main hinges allow the arms of the binoculars to move in and out; ensuring your child finds the best position for their eyes. They can then adjust the focus depending on what they are looking at. The focus knob is set in the middle of the joining bridge and is easy to adjust while using these binoculars.
The small ring near the eyepiece also usually needs two hands to operate and in some designs can interfere with the twist-up eye cup. Being small, it can also be less convenient to operate, especially wearing gloves. The degree of twist from closest focus to infinity varies between manufacturers. Some use a very small twist[11] (about a quarter of a turn) whereas others use a full turn or more. The small degree of twist gives a very fast focus but can be overly sensitive and in some designs too stiff to use single handed. A full turn is a practical compromise.

The Athlon Talos 8 x 32, Minox BV 8 x 33, and Vortex Diamondback Classic 8 x 32 are “tweener” or “large compact” binoculars—not particularly compact, but a size down from full-size. They feature the largest focusing wheel, wide/heavy bodies, and weigh as much as some full-size models. Though I wouldn’t trade them in for my go-to 8 x 42 pair (due to the narrower field of view), I actually found them to be a comfortable size for birding/nature-study, and didn’t find serious drawbacks during testing (though the Vortex Diamondback gave me minor eyestrain).
Now that you’re here, finding the perfect nighttime binocular for yourself or as a gift for an outdoor or nature enthusiast will be easy and quick. We’ve reviewed ten outstanding binoculars with night vision we believe are some of the best currently available in terms of features and capabilities, reliability as they are highly rated for their performance, and value for money. Our list includes the best infrared binoculars with true night vision and some daylight binoculars with low nightlight vision. If you’re not sure which one to choose, our buying guide explains the specifications you will come across and what you need to consider to make the right choice. Our FAQ section answers the questions you may have about how night vision binoculars work.
With that in mind I selected my top five binoculars from the initial tests and took them along with me to unfamiliar territory in southern Mexico for advanced testing. Working in the field is the ultimate test for any pair of binoculars. The optics need to do some very heavy lifting—studying intricate patterns of white vermiculation on the upper back of a woodcreeper before the bird scoots around the trunk of a tree, for example—while my brain sorts through several near-identical species, something I don’t get to do back home.
With 10x magnification and a 42mm objective lens diameter, the Viper HD is a high-end, full-size yet compact binocular that is well suited for any bird watching adventure. The High Density (HD), extra-low dispersion glass in the lens, together with an anti-reflective coating, delivers edge-to-edge clarity so you can see every detail on the bird in question. And at 341 feet, the binoculars offer a wide field of view so you can cover more ground when searching for specific birds. Use the center focus wheel to quickly dial in sharp views, while the locking, right-eye diopter can be used to tailor the individual focus of each barrel to match that required by your eyes. The rubber chassis with thumb indents make the binoculars comfortable to hold for long periods of time. Argon purging and o-ring seals provide bomber waterproof and fog proof performance through any outdoor conditions. An included chest harness enables you to comfortably carry the binoculars all day while having them always at the ready. 
The “42” in our 10x42 binocular refers to the diameter of the objective (front) lens in millimeters. Since the objectives will often be the largest portion of the optic, it will affect the overall size and weight of the binocular, and how much light it can gather. In basic terms: larger objectives allow more light to pass through them than smaller lenses, which means images will appear brighter, sharper, and clearer. However, the larger objectives will also add bulk and weight, and that is where certain tradeoffs and compromises need to be considered when deciding if certain models will be convenient to carry, pack, hold, and use comfortably.
Durability is also a defining characteristic of the Vortex tactical monocular. It is waterproof, fogproof, and dustproof. Its rubber exterior ensures a solid grasp so you do not drop it, and that exterior also protects the monocular from inclement water and from drops and dings. The included belt clip can also be used to clip the monocular wherever is most convenient for you (belt, backpack, etc.) for ultimate ease in transportation. The result is a compact monocular range finder that is durable, high quality, and rewarding to use.
A quick and simple microscope is just a smartphone adapter. Carson’s MicroMax Plus is currently offered in three models to fit Galaxy S4, iPhone 4/4s, and iPhone 5/5s. This optic simply clips over the phone’s camera and has magnifications from 60-100x. A similar optic by Bodelin, the ProScope Micro, comes in a version mostly for various iPhones and iPads, plus one for the Galaxy S4. Other simple handheld microscopes would be veho’s 200x USB model, or this iOptron offering that also has a stand. These plug into a laptop or desktop and come with imaging software to save and edit photos and videos. Another handheld model, again Celestron comes into the mix, is the LCD Handheld. Small and compact, it has a 3MP camera with 3.5-50x optical magnification with an additional 4x digital zoom. An internal card slot allows you to save for later viewing and runs on just two AA batteries.
Another type of prism coating, only used on roof prisms, is called “phase-correcting” coating. Because of the way roof prims reflect light, after it moves through the objective lens, it gets split into two separate beams that travel through the prism system independently. The beams experience a “phase shift” as one beam strikes the eyepiece lens a fraction of a second before the second beam. When the two beams are recombined in the eyepiece lens they are slightly out of phase with each other, which can affect color balance and rendition. By applying special coatings on the prism, the faster light beam is slowed to match the slower beam, bringing them back into phase when they hit the eyepiece lens—greatly improving color, clarity, and contrast versus non-phase-corrected prism binoculars. Under normal circumstances, most users won’t notice the difference, but pro users and avid birdwatchers may require it to be able to pick out important details at a distance or in challenging light. Since Porro prisms don’t suffer from phase shift, these coatings are not used on them.
A: Those who work in the military, law enforcement, security, search and rescue or astronomy and outdoor adventurers such as hunters, campers, hikers, skywatchers, stargazers, birdwatchers, nocturnal wildlife observers, backpackers, anglers, boaters, and sailers benefit the most from night vision binoculars. They can also be of benefit to everyone as safety, navigation, and surveillance tools in the dark. For example, you can use night binoculars to investigate intruders if you hear noises within your compound at night. You will be able to see who or what made the noise without being seen yourself. 

Quality construction also lends to a longer life for well cared for products. We judged each pair based on any alignment issue we could visually see, how smooth the hinges for adjusting the interpupillary distance were, we noted if anything was loose or coming apart, and we also took note of our biggest pet peeve: how well the lens caps fit. There is nothing like losing a lens cap to frustrate you on a trip.


Like many of the others, these binoculars do better classify as a learning toy than actual binoculars for a child’s use. So you don’t have to worry about breaking any banks to get your child learning materials. With that said, they are well below the average price for learning binoculars, which makes them ideal for parents that want to give their kids quality binoculars.
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When choosing a pair of binoculars, the magnification power, always the first number listed in bin features, refers to how much the binoculars increase the apparent size of the object you’re viewing. 10x (which is solid) will make whatever you’re looking at seem ten times bigger. The second number is the lens diameter, or how big the lens measures across its center (larger lenses let it more light, allowing distant objects to appear brighter and easier to see.) The trick is finding the right balance between magnification, lens diameter, and compactness. Below, the ones I recommend to anyone who asks.
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