For instance, one of our products reviewed also contains a compass, a flashlight, and a magnifying glass. This set is useful for many outdoor activities and will certainly increase your child’s interest in the surrounding environment. Such a set is not only fun but also extremely educational as it teaches your child from an early age to be more responsible and read the nature’s signs and interpret them correctly.
If you want a pair of binoculars for traveling or for the convenience of having a pair you can slip into your pocket, then a compact pair is for you. However, for distant subjects, or viewing in dim light (like, under the canopy of the rainforest), or for quickly finding fast-moving birds in dense vegetation, you’ll probably want to buy full-size binoculars rather than compacts.

Yes, these things cost nearly $3000. Why? Lots of reasons, starting with their powerful 10x magnification and 42mm diameter lenses, which work in concert to make faraway objects look nice and big and bright. But it’s also because their HighLux and AquaDura coated lenses create crisp contrast and clear colors, gathering all the detail you could want. There’s also the super-long 19mm eye relief, which makes the Leica bins ideal for people working in law enforcement, rescue, for military applications, or for nature study and/or photography. For when you need to see quickly and clearly in all sorts of conditions.
Stargazing presents a special set of circumstances, as you are viewing stationary objects that are very far away. To make it more complicated, the environment will have minimal light available. 10X 40 binoculars are typically recommended for this purpose. You can afford higher magnifications because you will not be moving the binoculars much, and to make up for the diminished field of vision and darker images that this will present, you have the large lens diameter.

The larger the exit pupil number, the better the binoculars will do in low-light conditions. Experts say that binoculars with an exit pupil of 5 mm or more are good for use in low-light conditions like dawn, dusk, fog, or in shadow. If you know you'll only be using your binoculars for daylight viewing, any exit pupil of 2 mm or better is just fine. That's because your own pupils constrict to about 2 mm diameter in bright light so, regardless of how much light your binoculars gather, you won't be able to see any more than that until the light dims and your pupils dilate again.
Resolution is a common term in any device that is used for viewing. The resolution affects the image quality of your night vision binoculars. Therefore, before buying one, you should take this into consideration. The higher the resolution on a device, the better the resulting image. Ideally, you should go for the highest resolution within your budget. It’s also important to note that resolution tends to deteriorate as you move from the center towards the edges of the image.
Gen3 night vision is a step up from second generation in that the new photocathode is used. A microchannel plate (MCP) is still present and the new coating on the MCP increases tube life. An ion barrier film on the microchannel plate causes a halo effect when looking at bright light sources. Generation 3 night vision devices and rifle scopes consume more power, but have light amplification of 30K-50K.
Normally, the higher the exit pupil, the larger the amount of light that you’ll be able to visualize. Since it’s difficult to get the right objective diameter, magnification, field of view, and exit pupil, it might be a good idea to refer to the size of the human pupil. In young people, the eye pupil is capable of dilating up to 7mm, whereas, in the elderly, it can dilate up to 4 mm. In this case, the rule of thumb is to choose hunting binoculars that feature an exit pupil with the same size or larger than the one you have in your eye.
A quick and simple microscope is just a smartphone adapter. Carson’s MicroMax Plus is currently offered in three models to fit Galaxy S4, iPhone 4/4s, and iPhone 5/5s. This optic simply clips over the phone’s camera and has magnifications from 60-100x. A similar optic by Bodelin, the ProScope Micro, comes in a version mostly for various iPhones and iPads, plus one for the Galaxy S4. Other simple handheld microscopes would be veho’s 200x USB model, or this iOptron offering that also has a stand. These plug into a laptop or desktop and come with imaging software to save and edit photos and videos. Another handheld model, again Celestron comes into the mix, is the LCD Handheld. Small and compact, it has a 3MP camera with 3.5-50x optical magnification with an additional 4x digital zoom. An internal card slot allows you to save for later viewing and runs on just two AA batteries.
Remember not to expect too much performance from an 8×25 or 10×25 pocket monocular though! These little monoculars have good power but a very limited view because of their small lens. You will need to first identify your subject and then use the monocular in a “point and shoot” manner. They can also be difficult to use due to their very small eyecup. If you want to enjoy a wider, sharper and brighter image, then you should always opt for a 30mm to 42mm monocular.
The device is made to be comfortable for your hands and your eyes with a lightweight but sturdy design. The anti-slip covering makes it easy for you to grip the device and hold on for longer periods of time. The ability to mount the device on a tripod or with a head strap also reduces the effort of carrying the device. The water-resistant device also holds well in harsh climatic conditions. It comes with an anti-reflection coated lens which makes it easy to drive away all the unwanted reflections and get a clear view of the target. It delivers a good range of up to 750 feet depending on the conditions in which it is used. It is powered by two AAA batteries which gives it great battery backup. With the infrared feature turned off, it gives a backup of around 70 hours. And with all the features fully turned on, the battery of the device lasts for at least 20 hours.
Got this for my son for xmas and it's broken already. The part in the middle of the two lenses broke off and so the lenses also fell off with nothing to hold them in place. It wasn't dropped or abused... my son was in one of those car strollers at the mall and said.."look mommy..it broke!!"... he'd had them around his neck the whole time so I know he hadn't dropped them. Money down the drain.
To see if ShippingPass is right for you, try a 30-day free trial. Also, with ShippingPass, there is no need to worry about commitment. If you decide you want to discontinue the service, you can cancel your subscription at any time. No matter what your shipping needs, Walmart's got you covered. Sign up for ShippingPass so you can shop more, save money and live better.
Like many families, we’re so busy in our everyday lives with schedules, afterschool activities and appointments that we often forget what it’s like for kids to have the experience of being outside. It seems like in today’s world almost every child has an iPhone, iPad or some other kind of electronic device. These days it seems like your child would rather look at a screen than seeing the world in a new and unique way.

When you view objects normally in low light, you’re limited to the electromagnetic spectrum, which determines the amount of visible light your eyes can see. IR illuminators help improve the ability to see at night in very low-lit areas. When shopping for night vision binoculars, make sure that they include IR illuminators to ensure they work in low-light or complete darkness.
Given as the first number in a binocular description (e.g. 7x35, 8x50), magnification is the ratio of the focal length of the objective divided by the focal length of the eyepiece. This gives the magnifying power of binoculars (sometimes expressed as "diameters"). A magnification factor of 7, for example, produces an image 7 times larger than the original seen from that distance. The desirable amount of magnification depends upon the intended application, and in most binoculars is a permanent, non-adjustable feature of the device (zoom binoculars are the exception). Hand-held binoculars typically have magnifications ranging from 7x to 10x, so they will be less susceptible to the effects of shaking hands.[8] A larger magnification leads to a smaller field of view and may require a tripod for image stability. Some specialized binoculars for astronomy or military use have magnifications ranging from 15x to 25x.[9]
Rangefinders  Rangefinder binoculars have an integrated infrared (IR) laser that is used to measure distance from the binocular to an object. They can be used at sea to measure the distance to another ship or possibly someone who needs rescuing, help hunters to measure the distance to their subject, or aid golfers to calculate their swing to the green. Rangefinder binoculars typically display the distance to the target in either feet or meters, with the readout visible in the eyepieces. Technological innovations have made the rangefinders more precise, and some can do a single spot measurement, or a constantly updated measurement so you can follow a moving subject and get virtually real-time distance.
Whether you're looking for an inexpensive first pair of binoculars, or want a good, secondary, compact pair that won't break the bank, the Vortex DiamondBack 8x28 will serve you well. These relatively small bins tip the scales at just 15 ounces, yet can provide enough brightness and clarity to identify small birds on a bright day. Top that off with high-quality construction and a smooth focus knob, and you've got an excellent pair of budget bins.

A simple trick for spotting stuff faster with binoculars: Don’t hold your binoculars up to your eyes and then pan and scan for what you’re trying to spot. You’ll never get there. Instead, with the naked eye, stare up at what you want to see, then raise the binoculars to your gaze. That’ll allow whatever you’re looking at to instantly pop into your magnified view.
Field of view (fov) specification. This parameter is sometimes stated incorrectly (over-stated) and needs interpreting with care when buying an instrument without first field-testing. It is normally expressed in degrees, m@1000m or ft@1000yds. An approximate conversion from degrees to m@1000m is to multiply degrees by 17.5 which can be used as a check if both values are stated. The author has carried out fov tests on several monoculars and the results shown in the table below. Generally, the manufacturer’s stated figure is accurate within a few % but two were considerably over-stated, one in particular (9x30) by 30%. When reviewing a claimed fov value, reference can be made to the fov/magnification relationship in Design, above. This relationship represents best-in-class and so anything substantially exceeding a fov value from this plot, for a given magnification, should be treated with caution, especially in budget offerings.
You would be forgiven for thinking this is an adult set of binoculars, they look fantastic! They are designed in a crisp black and white color. The lenses and the first half of the binoculars are white with the other half being black but curving into the center of the binoculars with the Cobiz name written discreetly in white. The binoculars arrive with a 2-foot long neck strap and a cleaning cloth, to keep them looking perfect and ensure every image remains crystal clear. You also get a carry bag with its own shoulder or neck strap. This helps the binoculars to stay safe when in transit.
Aurosports provides inexpensive yet quality and convenient binoculars that suit all kinds of outdoor observation needs. These Aurosports 10x25 binoculars are compact yet powerful binoculars perfect for bird watching, stargazing, backpacking, safari, sports and concerts watching, sailing, hiking, traveling, sightseeing, and outdoor explorations during the day and in the evening when the light is weak. It works very well for all these applications, is easy and comfortable to use, and offers clear viewing. The only weakness is that they don't work in complete darkness.
You are eligible for a full refund if no ShippingPass-eligible orders have been placed. You cannot receive a refund if you have placed a ShippingPass-eligible order. In this case, the Customer Care team will remove your account from auto-renewal to ensure you are not charged for an additional year and you can continue to use the subscription until the end of your subscription term.
With an objective lens of 50mm, the binocular does provide a magnification of 4x which is ideal in comparison with other binoculars available in the market. It comes with powerful infrared illumination which helps in seeing everything even when there is low lighting. As a night vision binocular, this is the feature which should be the best. And the Bushnell binocular does not fail at delivering. It is designed to deliver a viewing experience to its users. The optical clarity delivered by the binocular is unmatched for and gives you the best quality visuals you can ever ask for.
Some binoculars use image-stabilization technology to reduce shake at higher magnifications. This is done by having a gyroscope move part of the instrument, or by powered mechanisms driven by gyroscopic or inertial detectors, or via a mount designed to oppose and damp the effect of shaking movements. Stabilization may be enabled or disabled by the user as required. These techniques allow binoculars up to 20× to be hand-held, and much improve the image stability of lower-power instruments. There are some disadvantages: the image may not be quite as good as the best unstabilized binoculars when tripod-mounted, stabilized binoculars also tend to be more expensive and heavier than similarly specified non-stabilised binoculars.

Unlike many “toy” binoculars that don’t offer much in the way of real functionality, these binoculars from Think Peak actually work. Plus, they have lots of kid-friendly features like an easy-to-turn focus wheel, adjustable sizing that’s scaled for kids, and a grip that’s ergonomically designed to fit little hands. The whole thing, including the eyecups, is covered in shock-proof rubber that’s comfortable and protects both the binoculars and your child’s face. These binoculars come with a carrying case as well as a neck strap and lens-cleaning cloth.
The term “roof prism” was originally applied to the Abbe-Koenig (AK) prism design that corrected an image horizontally and vertically while maintaining a straight line from the point at which the light enters the prism and exits it. While the AK prism configuration is the most common, there are others that are variations on the original AK design, such as the Amici and Schmidt-Pechan (SP). While they accomplish the same basic function, the optical paths take different routes to correct the image orientation. The main advantage of the SP design is that it is more compact than both the Amici and AK prisms, resulting in thinner optical tubes that tend to be more comfortable to hold—especially during long glassing sessions. Zeiss is known for using SP prisms.
Curious about those singing summer nester you keep hearing in the trees? Trying to scout out some new routes from afar? We purchased 16 of the best binoculars on the market then brought them birding, backpacking, and bushwacking, all to find the perfect pair for your next outing. Binoculars can be somewhat confusing with 100's of nearly identical looking models only differentiated by arcane specifications and vague claims of crystal clear images. We're here to cut through the confusion with our side-by-side testing results. Whether you're an aspiring bir...
The Rangefinder series of binoculars from Zeiss features a built-in inclinometer that gives hunters holdover values for up to six ballistics profiles. The rangefinder determines the precise distance of your target, up to a maximum range of 2.3 kilometers. With 8x magnification and an objective lens diameter of 42mm, these binoculars are best for daytime hunting adventures. The binoculars feature a measuring range of 3/4 of a mile or 1200 meters where physical and environmental factors such as temperature and air pressure are taken into account. Use Bluetooth to connect to your phone and synchronize with the ZEISS Hunting App and transfer your personal ballistic data. The binoculars have storage capacity for up to nine ballistic profiles which can be set up within the app. The binoculars are both fog-proof and waterproof, so will withstand even the harshest hunting conditions. 
A. Night vision goggles should be handled carefully because they’re not particularly durable. If you drop your goggles, chances are good that they’ll break. Some devices are designed to take more wear and tear, though, so if you’re afraid that you’ll damage your night vision goggles, look for a model that can take a little more abuse — and comes with a warranty to protect your investment.

As a little side note, there are some binoculars that have integrated digital cameras. They range from about $20 and go up to $2,000, so there will probably be one to fit any budget. These make great presents for capturing images, and even video, of what you’re looking at—and again, kids love stuff like that. Bear in mind that the low-end ones won’t have spectacular resolution, but it’s still a pretty neat feature for kids.
The Ghost Hunter Night Vision binocular is one of the smallest night vision binocular in my collection of night vision binoculars. However, it can more than outperform some of its bigger competitors, especially in regards to the field of view. The Ghost Hunter has a 1X magnification and a 24 mm objective lens, which guarantee a broad field of view.

Barska’s Colorado scope is a nice place to start. With a straight-viewing zoom eyepiece that offers a broad 15-40x magnification range and a respectable 50mm objective, this one sports a simple tabletop tripod that can be set up on the hood of a car, a tailgate, or picnic table. Weighing less than a pound, kids will find it easy to use and it won’t take up a lot of space. Moving up a little, FireField’s 20x50 spotting scope also has a tabletop tripod, but with a fixed magnification, so using it is a bit easier without zoom rings to worry about, and it is water- and fog-proof. If the weather turns, the optic will be fine. In contrast to these two straight-viewing models, Celestron’s LandScout series has an angled view, which might be more comfortable when it’s set up on a table. What I particularly like about this one is that it has a large focusing collar, comfy for small hands. The LandScouts come in two sizes: a 10-30x50 and a larger 12-36x60 version, both for less than $50. Another great option is this Sightmark kit: you get a 15-45x60 spotter with a tabletop tripod, hard and soft cases, plus a filter set, all for less than $100. Looking at offerings with full-sized tripod, Celestron’s LandScout, as discussed above (both the 50mm and 60mm), are offered with adjustable-height aluminum tripods, a three-way head, and a backpack in which everything fits.
Also be aware, however, that the biggest monocular with the biggest magnification is not always the best choice. You must balance the optics against other features. For example, magnifications of 6 and 7 are often better for compact monoculars, because larger magnifications create shakiness in such a small device. Plus, compact monoculars will, by nature, have smaller lenses. Even larger monoculars with smaller lenses or magnifications can serve you well if they come with features such as multi-coated optics to maximize the clarity of the light coming through the lenses.
Although we didn’t cover any night vision binoculars that are infused with the Gen 3 technology, it’s important to understand and have the knowledge of all the generations before purchasing a night vision device. The Gen technology enables you to see longer distances and wider ranges than the typical night vision binocular set. If you’re a novice or beginner to this sort of technology, just remember that with each generation, the strength and power rise as well as the price. You will never see a Gen 3 night vision model be priced the same as a Gen 1 night vision model. Why? Simply because there is a huge difference in technological advances between the two.
There are a few key things to keep in mind when choosing a pair of binoculars for hunting. First off, remember that you’ll often be looking for animals in low light conditions, so light transmission is crucial. Also, you’ll be lugging them around difficult terrain, so buy a quality pair that will be able to take a few bumps without any major problems. 10×42 is the most common size of binoculars to carry while hunting, although you may want a larger pair if you are doing long range spotting.

Anyone looking to make far-away objects appear a bit closer should consider a good pair of binoculars. But you might wonder why this story is so oriented toward bird watching. The answer is simple: Binoculars that are great for birders are great for anyone looking to make things appear closer—whether you’re hunting, watching sports, or otherwise. That’s because birding asks everything you need to ask of binoculars. So even if you never plan to seek a scissor-tailed flycatcher or a harpy eagle, birding binoculars will do what you ask. (But you really should try out birding; for more info, contact your local Audubon Society, or, in North America, pick up either The Sibley Guide to Birds or the Kaufman Field Guide to Birds of North America.)
Engaging your kids in things that add value in your life is very important. For most outdoor activities, having a clear vision is crucial and this is why a binocular is important. Of course, you do not want kids to mess up with your high-quality optics. Therefore, it is only great if you buy them the best binocular for star gazing, hiking, bird watching, boat rides and much more. The Cobiz 10×25 Binocular is perfect for all those and much more.
5x power is the go-to magnification power for hunters and security professionals. It offers optimal magnification without reducing clarity. A 6x and higher power will reduce gain and amplify your hand’s movement, making it difficult to have a steady viewing and the image produced will be fuzzy and grainy. A 1x power is ideal for walking in the dark or viewing targets at close range.
The world has seen image stabilization in binoculars before now. A decade or so back, Canon brought us the first iteration of its IS binocular, which it continues to produce in several configurations. Nikon has an image-stabilized bino, and so does Zeiss, at the high end of the price range. All those brands developed the technology for their digital camera market, which is the origin of Fujifilm’s entry in the category: the Techno-Stabi.
Field of view (fov) and magnification are related; for a given situation, fov increases with decreasing magnification and vice versa. This applies to monoculars, binoculars and telescopes. However, this relationship also depends on optical design and manufacture, which can cause some variation. The chart below has been compiled by the author to show the fov/magnification relationship based on best-in-class data, taken both from personal tests and from manufacturers' specifications. Contrary to some belief, it is a myth that binoculars offer a wider field of view than monoculars. For a given specification and manufacturer offering both monocular or binocular options of the same model, the field of view is exactly the same whether monocular or binocular.

Pro Tip: If you plan on sharing your binoculars or using them for a variety of distances, stick with center-focusing models. For astronomy or marine use, individual focus will provide the sharpest views and you won’t have to adjust the focus very often because they will be focused on “infinity” (far-away subjects) where the focus won’t change much.

So, what exactly makes good binoculars? Binoculars’ optics consist of three main components that affect their performance: the ocular lenses (in the eyepiece), the objective lenses (the lenses that are farthest away from your face), and the prism, which we’ll discuss further in a bit. The ocular lens is a magnifier. So when you see binoculars’ specifications, the first number signifies how much that lens enlarges what you’re looking at. In the case of all the models we tested, that number is an eight, so you’re getting an image size eight times larger than you see with the naked eye. The objective lens gathers light; its related number—in our case, 42—indicates the diameter of that lens in millimeters. The bigger the lens, the more light it can gather.
The objective lens is protected by the use of lens caps, and it is also water and fog-resistant. This makes it the ideal piece of equipment to carry with you in harsh climatic conditions. At 3 pounds, it is not the lightest night vision binocular available in the market. But the weight is due to the incorporation of quality materials to make the product. It is a sacrifice we have to make to acquire a good quality product.
These binoculars can be bought for between $30 and $40 which makes them one of the most expensive options available. However, the quality of the product and the image clarity makes them an extremely worthwhile investment. This is borne out by an 86 review rating of 4 stars and above. In fact, there was only one 1 star review! As no manufacturer can get it perfect every time, this is a good indication of the quality of these binoculars. This is also the reason why they are on the best kids binoculars review list. It is important to note that the weight and size of these binoculars and their functions means this is suitable for older children, (over 7) rather than young kids.
This is a compact yet incredibly stylish offering suitable for a boy or a girl. The main hinges allow the arms of the binoculars to move in and out; ensuring your child finds the best position for their eyes. They can then adjust the focus depending on what they are looking at. The focus knob is set in the middle of the joining bridge and is easy to adjust while using these binoculars.
One glance at these binoculars and you will come up with one of two opinions. Either they are clearly for kids and look a little like a toy or they are not actually a pair of binoculars at all. In fact, these colorful binoculars look a little like goggles! However, this is a design feature to ensure they provide the very best experience for your children. The fact that you can purchase these binoculars for between $10 and $20 makes them one of the most attractive offerings on the best kids binoculars list. They are three distinct colors, a pale purple surrounds the lenses and the eyepiece, the main body yellow with a pale blue cross snaking over it diagonally. The overall effect is a spy toy for kids.
The last element of today’s great, affordable binoculars is optical coatings. Lens coatings perform various functions, such as improving light transmission, reducing glare, and keeping colors true. Coating quality and levels used to be a key differentiator between cheap and expensive binoculars, but these days, lens coating technology has come down in price. All of our picks use the highest level, which is full multicoating, meaning that all glass surfaces—most binoculars have between 10 and 16 such surfaces, called optical elements—are coated.
If you want a pair of binoculars for traveling or for the convenience of having a pair you can slip into your pocket, then a compact pair is for you. However, for distant subjects, or viewing in dim light (like, under the canopy of the rainforest), or for quickly finding fast-moving birds in dense vegetation, you’ll probably want to buy full-size binoculars rather than compacts.

Infrared monoculars use a different wavelength than light to illuminate the things you want to see at night. As a result, this type of monocular is typically used as a night vision monocular. Often, this technology can be turned on and off, so you can use the monocular both during the day and at night. The infrared monocular also tends to be affordable and relatively invisible. Some infrared monoculars, however, come with a red light that is visible and might disturb the animals you are hunting or observing.


All that computing horsepower doesn’t amount to much if you can’t see your target, but the Geovid’s image is at the head of its class. The Leica won our low-light test and turned in excellent resolution scores. Its field of view led the 10X field, and the Perger porro prism that gives the binocular its distinctive banana shape also gives it a very comfortable balance.
Weight is an important consideration when choosing a pair of night vision binoculars. Due to the sophisticated technology on the inside, nighttime binoculars tend to be heavier than regular ones. More advanced generations tend to be lighter but more capable than earlier generations. The ideal pair is not only well built to serve the purpose and last, but it is also lightweight for ease and comfort carrying it and using it on the move.
Hi Betty, a monocular is a great little tool when you need to inspect something at a distance. As it is compact and easy to carry around everywhere + it can provide the same power as binoculars (8x in your case which is standard magnification). Other people have difficulties looking through both eyes so a monocular works well for them. The downside with a monocular though is that it has a significatly narrower field of view than binoculars – because it only has one lens of course. So if you are on an African Safari you will benefit MUCH more from using a pair of binoculars. Because there is a-lot to see in the field. On a Safari trip, or during any wildlife or birdwatching observation for that matter, you are not always pointing at a specific subject. Many times you will need to first find the subject and follow it. For that reason binoculars work best. As your tour leader suggested 8×42 would be ideal for Safari. You can read more about choosing Safari binoculars and see our most recommended models here: https://procular.com.au/best-safari-binoculars-the-complete-guide/
With the many monoculars on the market today, it can sometimes be difficult to determine which ones are the best, especially since they all claim to offer you superb quality and great features. However, there are a few that stand out from the rest, either because of their all-around quality or because of a particular feature that makes them unique. Following are reviews of some of the best monoculars on the market today. These items stand out because of their features, their qualities, and the reviews from customers who have tried them and found that they perform excellently.
Like many of the others, these binoculars do better classify as a learning toy than actual binoculars for a child’s use. So you don’t have to worry about breaking any banks to get your child learning materials. With that said, they are well below the average price for learning binoculars, which makes them ideal for parents that want to give their kids quality binoculars.
The flared eye-cups are an obvious example. They do an excellent job of blocking out distractions and light from the periphery of your view and thus offer a far more immersive and indeed better view. This is especially true in situations where you may have the sun shining brightly from the side as there is no glare on the eye-piece lens as you would get with almost any other instrument. As they are so effective and seemingly easy to implement, it is really surprising to me that this fantastic, but small feature is not found on more optics.

Studies show that kids who spend more time outdoors have better focus, improved cognitive performance, less anxiety, exercise more, and a better appreciation for the environment. It’s also proven that families who enjoy outdoor activities together, such as camping, have better relationships. The best way to get our kids more interested in the outdoors is by providing them with tools that encourage a hands-on approach, like binoculars for example. These field glasses are basically two telescopes attached to each other in a way that allows you to use both of your eyes to view objects from a distance. The magnification varies from model to model, but they are typically small enough to be handheld and easily portable. With this device, your child can see the world from a new perspective that will engage their mind and pique their adventurous spirit!
Another factor you must check is how a set of nighttime binoculars is powered. You want to choose one whose source of power is convenient for you and the battery life is long enough for your expeditions. A set that uses separate batteries means you can swap batteries if the current battery is depleted and continue with your observation but an onboard rechargeable battery is cost efficient in the long run. 

These magnify at 8x and are specifically designed for outdoor use, birdwatching, or hunting, as well as some other outdoor activities like golf or other sports. They have a 128m field of view and the lens had a red broadband coating for great views. Other than that, the lenses are high quality and tested to withstand the wear and tear of little kids and teenagers.
As it is for most people, price is a factor, however what is more important to me is the value for money within a particular price bracket. So for example a high end binocular is almost always going to be a fairly expensive product, but within this high value price bracket, I look out for ones that offer more for your money than others with a similar price tag by their build quality, quality of their components and just how well they perform both optically and physically.
The Athlon Talos 8 x 32, Minox BV 8 x 33, and Vortex Diamondback Classic 8 x 32 are “tweener” or “large compact” binoculars—not particularly compact, but a size down from full-size. They feature the largest focusing wheel, wide/heavy bodies, and weigh as much as some full-size models. Though I wouldn’t trade them in for my go-to 8 x 42 pair (due to the narrower field of view), I actually found them to be a comfortable size for birding/nature-study, and didn’t find serious drawbacks during testing (though the Vortex Diamondback gave me minor eyestrain).
Cobiz provides some of the top products at a ridiculously affordable price. For the most bang for your buck, in addition to a pair of binoculars that will work without a doubt and have the highest quality magnification while still being kid-friendly, then you have to check this out. The Cobiz Kids Binoculars has an incredible 10x magnification in its zoom with a viewing range of 380 feet. The interesting thing that makes them unique, however, is the use of piano lacquer as a finish on the lenses. This may sound funny, but it ensures that viewing is clear and concise without the risk of lens obstructions. It can also be used at night time as a sort of night vision viewing lens which truly sets these binoculars apart and gives them an edge over the rest. They’re lightweight, come with a neck strap for easy carrying, and have an easily adjusted center focus knob. The look of these binoculars is sleek and from the outside, you’d never guess that they’re made specifically for kids, which is the great part about getting these as your child’s first pair. They’ll feel more grown-up with a magnification device that looks like it could be something their parents would use which also instills them with a sense of pride when using it. If you’re looking to encourage your kids to get outside and learn about nature, these binoculars are a great way to do it! BENEFITS These sleek-looking binoculars aren’t just here for looks. They have a strong magnification power which makes them perfect for precise viewing and target focusing. Pros
Buying a new pair of binoculars can be a daunting task, as you will encounter a wide range of models and prices. In order to choose the right pair, the key is to understand when and where you plan to use them. From there, you can better compare technical specs such as objective lens diameter, magnification power, field of view, and even prism type to narrow down your choices. Whether you are looking for a compact model for use in daytime outdoor activities or a full-size, standard model for serious bird watching and marine use, we have you covered. Here are our favorite binoculars for use in a variety of situations.
Eye relief is the distance from the rear eyepiece lens to the exit pupil or eye point.[18] It is the distance the observer must position his or her eye behind the eyepiece in order to see an unvignetted image. The longer the focal length of the eyepiece, the greater the potential eye relief. Binoculars may have eye relief ranging from a few millimeters to 2.5 centimeters or more. Eye relief can be particularly important for eyeglass wearers. The eye of an eyeglass wearer is typically further from the eye piece which necessitates a longer eye relief in order to avoid vignetting and, in the extreme cases, to conserve the entire field of view. Binoculars with short eye relief can also be hard to use in instances where it is difficult to hold them steady.
×