Visually impaired people may use monoculars to see objects at distances at which people with normal vision do not have difficulty, e.g., to read text on a chalkboard or projection screen. Applications for viewing more distant objects include natural history, hunting, marine and military. Compact monoculars are also used in art galleries and museums to obtain a closer view of exhibits.

More and more people are turning to night vision goggles for their night vision needs, but there are still some solid binos out there. If you’re shopping for the best night vision binocular, I’m sure that you know there are a wide variety of great brands and offers out there. In fact, you may be reading this article because you’re slightly overwhelmed over what’s on the market!
As it is for most people, price is a factor, however what is more important to me is the value for money within a particular price bracket. So for example a high end binocular is almost always going to be a fairly expensive product, but within this high value price bracket, I look out for ones that offer more for your money than others with a similar price tag by their build quality, quality of their components and just how well they perform both optically and physically.
This lightweight (18-ounce) double-hinge, open-bridge binocular is easy on the neck, and at just under $200, it’s easy on the wallet, too. But it’s hard on the eyes. The Carson turned in one of the most disappointing resolution scores, and while it did better on our low-light test, we noticed significant edge distortion and some flaring, possibly owing to poorly coated internal lens surfaces.
These Gen 1 binos are a little spendy, but you’ll soon see that quality night vision binoculars typically are. The infrared illuminator enables you to see clearly even in total darkness. These are particularly useful for hunting because they are lightweight and compact. Additionally, the center focus ring is easy to maneuver and there are only two buttons to contend with — one is for turning it on/off, and the other is to activate the infrared illuminator. The ease of use is another big plus for hunters, as you need to be able to catch sight things quickly and quietly. This pair requires one 3-volt Type-123 lithium battery, which is not included. You’ll get a battery life of 40-80 hours depending on how much you use the infrared.
During testing in Southern California and/or southern Mexico, a few other models proved very good at bringing in color under harsh conditions, including the Bushnell Legend L Series, Celestron TrailSeeker, Carson 3D, and the Nikon Monarch 5 (my favorite of four Nikon models at the target price point). Neither the Nikon nor the Carson model had the wide field of view at distance the Midas ED boasted. The Nikon was 361 feet at 1,000 yards versus 426 feet for the Athlons, Bushnells, and Celestrons, which had the widest fields of view I tested. The Carson 3D binoculars were incredibly sharp and easily as bright as the Athlons, but felt almost as if they had tunnel vision, likely because their field of view was around 20 percent narrower than that of the Athlons. These field-of-view differences proved more noticeable when trying to differentiate spot-breasted wrens from rufous-and-white wrens as they crawled through vine tangles in southern Mexico, for example; the Nikon pair’s narrower field, which had otherwise excellent glass, seemed to require more time to find the birds than the Athlon pair did (and tellingly, by the end of the trip, I was grabbing the Athlons each morning).
I know that some museums, like the Louvre or Musee d'Orsay, are well lit - while some parts of Versailles, cathedrals and churches like the Sistine Chapel - are a bit dim (almost dark)...so if you can handle a bino larger than a compact (up to 25mm objective lens diameter) you may want to think about upping the size to a 30-40mm to help make the view brighter if you know the rooms will have challenging lighting.
Also be aware, however, that the biggest monocular with the biggest magnification is not always the best choice. You must balance the optics against other features. For example, magnifications of 6 and 7 are often better for compact monoculars, because larger magnifications create shakiness in such a small device. Plus, compact monoculars will, by nature, have smaller lenses. Even larger monoculars with smaller lenses or magnifications can serve you well if they come with features such as multi-coated optics to maximize the clarity of the light coming through the lenses.
In binoculars with roof prisms the light path is split into two paths that reflect on either side of the roof prism ridge. One half of the light reflects from roof surface 1 to roof surface 2. The other half of the light reflects from roof surface 2 to roof surface 1. This causes the light to become partially polarized (due to a phenomenon called Brewster's angle). During subsequent reflections the direction of this polarization vector is changed but it is changed differently for each path in a manner similar to a Foucault pendulum. When the light following the two paths is recombined the polarization vectors of each path do not coincide. The angle between the two polarization vectors is called the phase shift, or the geometric phase, or the Berry phase. This interference between the two paths with different geometric phase results in a varying intensity distribution in the image reducing apparent contrast and resolution compared to a porro prism erecting system.[27] These unwanted interference effects can be suppressed by vapor depositing a special dielectric coating known as a phase-correction coating or P-coating on the roof surfaces of the roof prism. This coating corrects for the difference in geometric phase between the two paths so both have effectively the same phase shift and no interference degrades the image.
This new optic from Bushnell has those two in-line hinges, but it’s 50 percent larger than most binoculars in the compact class, weighing just over 13 ounces. That’s a good thing, since size matters in glassing, and hand-filling heft is usually better than the alternative. Before getting into its attributes, a few complaints: The 10X magnification is better suited to larger-frame binoculars; the better magnification for this size is 8X. Second, the focus control is about 50 percent too small. And the 2-position eyecups are sloppy.
There are all kinds of low light vision and night vision binoculars available. Even though they have the same design, they have different features and capabilities. Plus they are not cheap pieces of technology. Careful consideration is crucial to ensure you choose a pair that best suits your intended application, spend your hard-earned money well, and feel satisfied with your purchase for years to come. Below are the factors to consider when evaluating and choosing night vision binoculars:
These were purchased for my classroom through Donors Choose. They are perfect for an elementary school class. Sturdy, but good magnification. Not too many ways to adjust, but that's often a good thing when dealing with 30+ student. They're pretty intuitive to use, given that my students had basically never handled binoculars before. Good price, too. I would recommend to anyone looking for starter binoculars for younger children. And the rubber around pretty much everything is great given how many, "Oops I dropped it," occurred (because they just never seem to remember to put the cord around their necks!)
Many binoculars have a range finding reticle (scale) superimposed upon the view. This scale allows the distance to the object to be estimated if the object's height is known (or estimable). The common mariner 7×50 binoculars have these scales with the angle between marks equal to 5 mil.[30] One mil is equivalent to the angle between the top and bottom of an object one meter in height at a distance of 1000 meters.

But that tactical exterior! The angular controls are distinctive and should appeal to would-be operators. The aggressive knobs actually serve a function: the center-hinge tripod adapter cover, often maddeningly hard to remove on other brands, is easy to turn on the open-barrel Sig. So is the focus wheel, which is unfortunately spongy and requires frequent tuning to keep the image in sharp focus. The deep texturing and square tubes are easy to hold and grip.


Being diurnal and created to be active during the day and asleep at night, our eyes aren’t naturally equipped to see clearly in the dark. Thankfully, we have night vision technology to overcome this limitation. Out of the nighttime viewing devices available such as monoculars and goggles, night binoculars provide the best experience. They offer a wide field of view, superior depth perception, and deliver clear images enabling us to pick up finer details. They boost our night vision enabling us to clearly and covertly observe targets even at a distance.
Many people find that having compact sized binoculars is an advantage when traveling through rough terrains or carrying lots of equipment. New technology is constantly improving on the size and weight of these binoculars. Currently, you can find models that weigh half a pound and are of very high quality. In the future, compact sized binoculars may even be the norm. Today, however, many are not as powerful as their full-sized counterparts.

Terms such as coated, multi-coated and fully multi-coated refer to the location and type of coating processes used. Coated lenses are the most basic and denote that at least one lens surface has at least one layer of coating on it. Multi-coated means that multiple surfaces are coated and/or multiple layers of coatings have been applied to each surface. Fully multi-coated means that all surfaces—inner and outer—of the lenses have multiple layers applied to them. This treatment offers the highest level of light transmission, clarity, contrast, and color rendition. At the pinnacle is broadband fully multi-coated. These coatings are engineered to be effective across a wide spectrum of wavelengths and provide the best performance.
Magnification sizes typically run from 6x to 12x, although you'll sometimes find binoculars with magnification powers of 20x or more. The sweet spot for most uses is 8x magnification; it gives good detail, but doesn't magnify things so much that the normal movement of your hand produces a shaky image. Birders or hunters who have very steady hands or routinely use a tripod will sometimes go as high as 10x or 12x magnification to better spot soaring raptors or count points on a distant buck, but rarely more.
Incidentally, one odd problem with the Nikon Monarch 5 (our pick in our previous binoculars guide) was a loud, rubber-on-rubber squeaking sound the focusing wheel often made when coming into contact with the rubber housing. I would have thought this was a random, fixable issue, but judging from online reviews, others complained about this too. The problem seems limited to individual pairs, so send yours back if they start doing this.
A number of solar system objects that are mostly to completely invisible to the human eye are reasonably detectable with medium-size binoculars, including larger craters on the Moon; the dim outer planets Uranus and Neptune; the inner "minor planets" Ceres, Vesta and Pallas; Saturn's largest moon Titan; and the Galilean moons of Jupiter. Although visible unaided in pollution-free skies, Uranus and Vesta require binoculars for easy detection. 10×50 binoculars are limited to an apparent magnitude of +9.5 to +11 depending on sky conditions and observer experience.[32] Asteroids like Interamnia, Davida, Europa and, unless under exceptional conditions Hygiea, are too faint to be seen with commonly sold binoculars. Likewise too faint to be seen with most binoculars are the planetary moons except the Galileans and Titan, and the dwarf planets Pluto and Eris. Other difficult binocular targets include the phases of Venus and the rings of Saturn. Only binoculars with very high magnification, 20x or higher, are capable of discerning Saturn's rings to a recognizable extent. High-power binoculars can sometimes show one or two cloud belts on the disk of Jupiter if optics and observing conditions are sufficiently good.
The only porro-prism binocular in this year’s test, the ShadowQuest is made to perform a very specific task: to help you methodically pick apart the landscape and find distant critters at the very edges of daylight. And it does a heck of a job of it. This was the only binocular to notch a perfect score for low-light performance, and it also finished near the top in resolution. What’s more, no amount of soaking, freezing, or thawing significantly obscured the image. It has ­individual-​eyepiece focusing, so you can’t refocus quickly, but that’s not what the ShadowQuest is made for. You get yourself a good vantage point, you set the focus (which will then be sharp from 20 yards to infinity), and then you start searching this binocular’s huge field of view to spot animals you might well miss with other models.

These lightweight field glasses can magnify up to eight times and are designed for children looking to explore the outdoors and learn more about their environment. They have a large and easy-to-use focus knob and can be adjusted for a custom fit. It is built from eco-friendly material and ensures eye comfort and protection with rubber surrounded eyepieces. This is great for first-time users looking to get in touch with nature.
The two operational buttons, which control range and mode, are so close together that it takes some practice to get proficient with their use. And because the laser transmitter is located on the front of the hinge, in the spot where most binoculars have a tripod-mounting receiver, you need a separate accessory to mount the Geovid. That’s not a small consideration, since you’ll want to stabilize this optic for ranging out past about 1,000 yards.
We chose to limit our tests to 8x42 binoculars for a number of reasons, one being that we found 10x binoculars to be too shaky, like walking around with a fully zoomed telephoto camera lens. Plus, the 42 objective-lens size is perfect for balancing brightness and clarity with weight. Compact binoculars, which have smaller objective lenses, are often much dimmer. They’re not great if you want to truly spot and identify something in the field, though good reasons to use smaller binoculars do exist, as many backpackers and travel-light types will attest. We plan to test compact binoculars soon.

Orion offers telescopes for every level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced, and Expert. From our entry level beginner telescopes for amateur astronomers to our Dobsonian telescopes to our most advanced Cassegrain telescopes and accessories, you can find the best telescope for you. Because we sell direct, we can offer you tremendous value at a great price. Not sure how to choose a telescope? Orion's Telescope Buyer's Guide is a great place to start.
Gen3 night vision is a step up from second generation in that the new photocathode is used. A microchannel plate (MCP) is still present and the new coating on the MCP increases tube life. An ion barrier film on the microchannel plate causes a halo effect when looking at bright light sources. Generation 3 night vision devices and rifle scopes consume more power, but have light amplification of 30K-50K.

The ExplorerOne ships with a carry bag for easy portability as well as a loop that can be strapped to your child’s belt. The 6X magnification is quite generous for a young person's binoculars and leaves lots of room to grow. Last but not least, we liked the oversized focus knob which makes using the product very simple. The ExploreOne Binoculars offer children a great opportunity to discover their world in a child-centric way.
The Yukon Tracker is a rugged product that you can take out into the wild with you without worrying that it is not going to withstand the elements. It has rubber armor for protection and is weather as well as drop resistant. The image quality is quite good despite the fact that the magnification is not as high as other night vision binoculars and it also has a reasonable battery life, which can prevent you from being stuck in the dark due to a flat battery. If the magnification and lens were better for the price the Yukon Tracker could easily have been a top contender, but as is it is beaten to the position by the Night Owl Pro Nexgen.
If you are looking for a monocular that you can take out in the rain without worry, the OUTERDO might be right for you. This waterproof monocular is one of the best monoculars simply because it can withstand some rain and dampness. It manages to stay waterproof for the life of the monocular thanks to the green rubber covering that encases the metal body of the monocular. Reviewers give this product high praise because of its durable, waterproof nature.

Bushnell is a well-known name in the binocular market. Even better? They have spectacular night vision binoculars! This company has been in business for over 65 years. Their expertise is in providing the best optics products for any outdoor or sporting occasion. These excursions include fishing, hunting, stargazing, golf, bird watching, the study of nature and much more. They even create binoculars for indoor activities such as viewing the opera or watching the car race.

A simple trick for spotting stuff faster with binoculars: Don’t hold your binoculars up to your eyes and then pan and scan for what you’re trying to spot. You’ll never get there. Instead, with the naked eye, stare up at what you want to see, then raise the binoculars to your gaze. That’ll allow whatever you’re looking at to instantly pop into your magnified view.


The zoom lens on a pair of binoculars can allow you to see things up to 15X closer, which may come in handy if you're coaching a sports team, and you're trying to get a sense of very minute details, like a quarterback's technique, or a relay team's ability to pass the baton. The same applies to watching musicians in an orchestra, or eyeing up what an experienced fisher in a far-off boat might be using to bait his line. This is why binoculars have proven to be such an indispensable part of any surveillance work. They're capable of uncovering what cannot be deciphered by the human eye.

I would like to draw your attention to the Tom Lock 10x42 Series 2 binocular, that ran the Carson very close and with a BBR score of 70%, would have been right up there with last years winner and which is why I feel that they are well worth a mention and urge you to take a closer look at if you are after a slightly higher powered, but low cost 10x device.

You should be able to purchase the Kidwinz for between $30 and $40 which makes them good value for money. They arrive with an operations manual and their own nylon case. You will also find a cleaning cloth, which will be essential, and a 2-foot long neck strap. This can be easily attached to the binoculars through the loops provided. The binoculars weigh 8 ounces which will help to ensure most children can comfortably carry them all day. They measure 4.9 inches by 4.2 inches by just 2.3 inches thick. This ensures they are small enough to be comfortably held in your child’s hands. These binoculars are equipped with rubber eye surrounds. This will ensure they are comfortable when being held up to your child’s eyes; even if they wear glasses. It also prevents them from banging their eyes against the glass on the binocular and reduces the amount of light visible at source as opposed to light emitted from where they are looking at. You will also receive a high-quality carry case to help keep the binoculars safe when they are not being used. Perhaps most importantly is the fact that these binoculars are designed to withstand being dropped. They are coated in rubber to help absorb any impact; even if your child drops them on a hard floor! This is a vital feature if you are spending money on a child’s gift; they are likely to be dropped at let once by accident!


Generation 3 also uses an MCP amplifier but their photo-cathode tubes have gallium arsenide, which amplifies their resolution enabling them to deliver clear and intricately detailed images even in the darkest conditions. Some have White Phosphor Technology (WPT) that enables them to produce images in black and white not just black or green. Its range is 300 yards. However, gen 3 binoculars are very expensive and are primarily used by the military.

The first step to finding the right set of night binoculars is to determine your requirements. Knowing exactly what you’re looking for makes it easier to find a set that will best suit your needs. After determining what you want from your new nightlight binoculars and what you are willing to spend, you can look at the best offerings in the market and choose one that meets your needs and budget.
The Night Owl Pro Nexgen Night Vision Binocular offers the trademark Night Owl quality and ease of use without a price tag that is going to put you in debt. It is certainly not the cheapest night vision binocular on the market, but you do get plenty of value for your money. The 5X magnification is probably more than you would need while operating in the dark and the binoculars work great even when only using ambient light thanks to the image intensifier tubes. Switch on the built-in infrared illuminator and you will get an even better range in total darkness.
Next, the larger lenses also combine with the 5x power to produce a nice large 6mm (30÷5) exit pupil. This not only ensures that more than enough light goes through the instrument and on to the eyes of your child for them to perceive a bright image, but this wide tube of light also makes it MUCH easier for them to line their eyes up with these shafts of light and so see the full image without dark rings on the sides.
A tale of two optics, the aggressive tactical styling of the Zulu5’s exterior gave us hope for high-performance glass inside its angular exterior. Alas, the optics disappointed the team. The Zulu5 turned in the field’s lowest low-light score and below-average resolution scores. We recorded some edge distortion and poorly coated internal lens surfaces.
Vanguard’s Spirit ED binoculars are very worthy of mention in this section. They come in four sizes: 8X36, 8X42, 10X42, and 10X50. The 10X42 pair have a 314 ft. field of view and 16 mm eye relief. Like its counterparts in this section, these binoculars are waterproof, fog proof, and have coated lenses. They weigh a bit more than the other binoculars in this section at 29.8 ounces.
Here again, both of our Best Buy winners impressed, earning scores of 7 out of 10 for brightness. Both the Vortex Diamondback 8x28 and the Celestra Nature DX 8x42 produced exceptionally bright images when we used them midday in good light. Both models did struggle a bit in low-light situations, however. Many early morning birds lacked some color and looked more like silhouettes until the sun got a bit higher.
Though pricier than other brands of binoculars, the reward is well worth the cost as the Leica Geovid is one of the most accurate rangefinder binoculars on the market. Featuring state-of-the-art optics and a field of view exceeding 1,000 yards, these industry-leading Leica binoculars offer everything from automatic adjustments of the visual settings to an ergonomic design that ensures comfort regardless of how long they are held.

The ambient light available in the dark will be coming through the lens of your night vision binoculars. It is important that the lenses are of high-quality construction. Multi-coated lens where the lenses have layers of coating to make them anti-reflective, scratch resistant, and water repellent increase light transmission to ensure maximum light gain for the best quality images and ensure long-lasting performance. Lenses are a fragile component and lens covers are important accessories to protect them when not in use.
EXO Barrier, quite simply, is the best protective lens coating technology Bushnell® has ever developed. Added at the end of the coating process, EXO Barrier molecularly bonds to the lens and lls microscopic pores in the glass. The result is an ultra-slick coating that repels water, oil, fog, dust and debris -- rain, snow, fingerprints and dirt will not stick. EXO Barrier is built to last: the bonded coating will not fade from the passage of time or normal wear and tear.
At OpticsPlanet, we offer the best brand name pocket monoculars - Barska Monoculars, Leica Monoculars, Vortex Monoculars, Zeiss Monoculars and a huge selection to find the perfect match for you. Monoculars are handy when you want a portable long range viewing option that can fit in your pocket. We offer a full range of compact monoculars, from premium night vision monoculars to monoculars that are awesome for the kids to play with to the top of the line Nikon and Zeiss Optics Monoculars that will withstand the elements. If you have any questions about what monocular will best fit your needs, our product specialists can help you out. Otherwise, take a look at our Monoscope How To Guide to get a better idea of what you're looking for.
Field of view is measured at a thousand yard distance because you'll only really notice a difference when looking far into the distance. So if you're looking for bins to scope out lines on a distant ridge, you'll probably appreciate a wider field of view. If you're using binoculars to watch wildlife, which will generally be within a couple hundred feet of you, you probably won't be able to notice the difference between a 300 foot and 450 foot field of view, as the difference will be negligible at that distance.
Glass in the Krotos is good, with sharp edge detail and adequate resolution and good low-light performance. Other hits include the smart pull-to-turn center-wheel diopter control and the strong double-hinge design. We’re still not sure what the “dual ED glass” that Cabela’s advertises actually is, but this is a solid, durable optic that’s priced right. If not quite a square deal, at least we can say it’s a circular deal.

Travis Pike is a Marine infantry veteran, firearms enthusiast, and NRA certified instructor. He’s a lifelong shooter who just happened to be mediocre enough with a gun and a keyboard to combine the two and write. He currently teaches concealed carry courses and enjoys spending time in Florida’s Nature Coast. He is interested in helping folks protect themselves with firearms and shoot better at the range.

Finally, make sure the model has a focus ring that will suit your particular uses. If you are tracking birds, for example, you’ll want a focus ring that moves just easily enough that you can make quick adjustments, but not so easily that you can inadvertently bump an image out of focus. On the other hand, if you mostly view stationary objects, you might prefer a very stiff focus ring that is next to impossible to accidentally move.
We believe that the compact binoculars (Bushnell 8×25 H2O) would work better than the other two monoculars. Especially if you will be spotting the subjects from a moving vehicle (or if their vehicles will be moving). We would definitely not go with the Vortex Solo 8×25 monocular as it is very difficult to locate your subjects with. The view is too narrow. The Vortex Solo 8×36 monocular is an excellent product with a wider view and sharp image – it will work but again, not as effective in your case as the Bushnell 8×25 compact binoculars. We hope this helps. In any case you are very welcome to order, test and return as long as the product remains in a brand new, re-sellable condition with all included accessories and product box unused and in mint condition.
When it comes to optical performance, the binocular is among the best in its range. It has a 2.5X magnification. It beats most binoculars in this range, which has a 2.0 X magnification. This means the Bushnell LYNX has 25% more magnification when compared to other products in its category. The clarity of the binocular is further enhanced by a 40mm f/2.0 lens system. Combine this with a 1st generation intensifier tube and you are assured of clear images at great distances with minimal light. The clarity of images is further improved by the use of antireflection multi-coated glass optics. These particular optics increases the light transmission resulting in clearer images despite the low ambient light.
One of the features that make these binoculars impressive is the clarity you get, even when you view your surroundings with minimal ambient light. Things get even better once you switch on the IR illuminator. The quality is so good on the Pro Nexgen, you might find it hard believing that the device uses generation 1 technology. When the IR is off, you get more detail and less distance. The range is increased when IR is on although the quality tends to reduce. Since the binoculars work well without IR, you do not have to use your batteries all the time. According to the manufacturer, you can have up to 80 hours of battery life with the Nexgen. It’s important to note that the Pro Nexgen uses the CR123A battery type, which does not come cheap.
OutNowTech Ultra Compact Folding Binoculars are ‘real’ binoculars, not toys, but may be a good choice for kids, especially older kids that are looking for true functionality with their binoculars. With their sturdy, durable design,  you’ll feel confident handing them off to your younger children, as well. They are weatherproof for outdoor use in almost any conditions and are lightweight and compact, making them easy to take on trips and light enough for children to hold comfortably. The folding design adds to their convenience but also means they are adjustable in width and can fit both children and adults comfortably.
Other no-go categories that we won’t be touching anytime soon are zoom binoculars or binoculars that include a digital camera. In the former case, you’ll end up with optics so compromised (less light-gathering ability, lower clarity) that the convenience of multiple levels of magnification would be quickly negated. In the latter, the quality of the cameras found inside these neither-here-nor-there binoculars is about a thousand years behind even the most basic modern smartphone. Stay away.
Now that you’re here, finding the perfect nighttime binocular for yourself or as a gift for an outdoor or nature enthusiast will be easy and quick. We’ve reviewed ten outstanding binoculars with night vision we believe are some of the best currently available in terms of features and capabilities, reliability as they are highly rated for their performance, and value for money. Our list includes the best infrared binoculars with true night vision and some daylight binoculars with low nightlight vision. If you’re not sure which one to choose, our buying guide explains the specifications you will come across and what you need to consider to make the right choice. Our FAQ section answers the questions you may have about how night vision binoculars work.
These are the lowest price binoculars so far, around the same range as the last ones. You get a fair amount out of it though, sturdy grip, lanyard, and some other nice amenities. But again, this is more of a children’s exploration toy than actual binoculars. With that said, we highly recommend them for parents that want to give a fun gift to their young kid that wants to feel like an explorer for the day.
A monocular is a modified refracting telescope used to magnify the images of distant objects by passing light through a series of lenses and usually prisms, the application of prisms resulting in a lightweight, compact telescope. Volume and weight are less than half those of binoculars of similar optical properties, making a monocular easy to carry, and also proportionally less expensive. Monoculars produce 2-dimensional images, while binoculars add perception of depth (3 dimensions), assuming one has normal binocular vision.
These binoculars are 6.9 inches long by 5.5 inches wide and 2.8 inches deep, they weigh 4.8 ounces which is light enough to allow a small child to carry them around all day. They arrive with an adjustable neck strap; maximum length of this strap is 30 inches! However, these binoculars only offer a magnification level of 2, while this might be perfect as an introductory set for your 3-year-old it is likely that older children will not find them very helpful or practical. The suggested age range is between 3 years and 11 years but an 11-year-old will probably prefer something a little more grown-up looking.

Since 1975 Orion Telescopes & Binoculars has been offering outdoor optics for sale direct to customers. Now an employee-owned company, we pride ourselves on an unswerving commitment to best quality products, value and unmatched customer care. Our 100% satisfaction guarantee says it all. In addition to our quality binoculars, we are known for our telescopes, accessories, and astrophotography equipment. Because we sell direct, we can offer you tremendous value at a great price.

×