I would recommend the Opticron 10x28 BGA T PC Oasis Binocular, B&H # OP10X28BGATO, for your usage needs.  While many manufacturers do not specify the interpupillary adjustment for their binoculars, I have found that the Opticron 10x28 BGA T PC Oasis Binocular would have one of the best ranges, measuring 36 mm to 71 mm (1.4 to 2.8"), which would work well for your stated 47mm (1.85") measurement requirement.

In an obligatory CMA statement, I will cheerfully concede that you don't absolutely need one of these state-of-the-art binoculars to enjoy success in the field. Affordable binos that serve dutifully if not beautifully are plentiful. However, if you're a car freak with means, you drive the cream of the Lamborghini crop. If you're an optics freak, why wouldn't you want the best?


All binoculars can focus at endlessness. The actual trick in binocular design is how meticulously it can be made to keep the focus. Any birder that started out with a cheap pair of binoculars must have experienced standing 10 or 14 feet behind the remainder of the group to look at a bird that was inside their close focus ability. Multi-purpose binoculars possess a close focus around 21 to 26 feet. An outstanding birding binocular should have a close focus of 12 feet or less, with the existing close focus champ coming in at a mere 4 feet.
The good news is we really didn't run into any binoculars that were uncomfortable to hold. No matter what model you buy you'll likely be able to use them for hours on end without any nagging discomforts. However, small touches like the nice thumb indents on the Vortex Viper makes the bins feel a bit more ergonomic and comfortable. Likewise, the tacky rubber coating of the Nikon Monarch models lends a solid feeling grip whether you're fondling the barrels like you're double fisting beer cans, or using a dainty fingertip grip as if you're sipping tea at a fancy party.
Typically, monoculars are sold with numbers like 10X47 printed on them. The first number indicates the magnification, with numbers ranging from 4 to 10 being common, but manufacturers make a wide range. Those with larger numbers have more magnification, but they usually have a smaller viewing area. The second number indicates the lenses' diameter in millimeters, with larger numbers letting in more light than those with smaller numbers.
Both the Steiner 10x50 Military/Marine Binocular, B&H # ST10X50MMB, and the Steiner 10x42 Predator AF Binocular, B&H # ST10X42PAFB, would be good options for your usage needs.  As both are 10x binoculars, both would have the same amount of magnification.  The main difference would be the 10x42 binoculars would have a wider angle of view at the same distance.  The 10x50 binoculars would be better in low-lighting, though the 10x42 would have more contrast and is color-corrected for the contrast and colors seen seen in the peak human vision sensitivity range to make it easier to spot game in difficult environments.  If you are viewing in low light and need the brightest performance, I would go with the 10x50 optics.  If you will be viewing in bright to mid-range lighting, and only occasionally be in extremely low light, then the 10x42 would work for your usage needs.  For more information, you can see the following link by either clicking directly on it or by copying and pasting the link into your internet browser's address bar:
If you've never gone binocular shopping before, you might not realize how many different kinds there are. Modern options come with an almost endless array of options and features, from lens coatings and prism types, to rubber armoring, eyecups, focus types, and more. There are also many waterproof binoculars available today, which can literally be submerged in water without leaking or fogging up - they've become indispensible for hunters and outdoorsmen. Sizes range from mini and compact binoculars that fit in your palm or your pocket, all the way up to the so-called giant binoculars made for astronomy and extreme long-range viewing, which require a tripod for stability and may even be permanently mounted in place. For those of you who are budget-minded, we offer discount binoculars for all needs and applications, as well as general use models that help minimize the need for more than one optic. On the other hand, if you're looking for a very particular type or level of performance, we also carry lots of specialty binoculars that will give you the exact performance you need, like birding binoculars, astronomy binoculars, and hunting binoculars.

Bushnell Night Vision Devices Carson Night Vision ITT Night Vision Minox Night Vision Morovision Night Vision Night Detective Night Vision Night Owl Optics N-Vision Optics Night Vision Tasco Night Vision US Night Vision Night Vision Yukon Night Vision Zeiss Night Vision Solar Chargers Laptop Computer Accessories Unavailable Night Vision Goggles / Binoculars
While the Leupold scored in the upper half of the class on the resolution range and third from the top in the low-light test, testers reported eye fatigue after prolonged glassing sessions. That’s generally a symptom of either poor ergonomics or balance, and testers said they had to constantly fiddle with the focus control. Others said the square eyecups didn’t fit their eyes well. While we’re griping, we’d also like to see reference marks on the diopter control.
As mentioned, this is a Gen 1 device. That means you won’t get the insanely powerful IR illuminators of more expensive Gen 2 and Gen 3 devices. However, the IR illuminator actually works very well and lets you see your surroundings. The 2x magnification will bring things a bit closer to you. However, if you intend on putting these on a helmet for continuous use, that might be a downside. If you’re using them continuously, you’ll want to know what’s around you, not a bit further away, so 1x magnification is recommended. The image is actually clear, and anything that is in your vicinity will be well illuminated, especially if you have the moon on your side. Clarity and sharpness is something cheap night vision binoculars often compromise on in order to keep the costs down, but that’s not the case with Sightmark.

Another pair of stylish green binoculars has appeared on our best kids binoculars list! This pair has a touch of medium blue at the base of the eyepieces which merges across the base of the main body. The blue theme continues down each side of the lenses, created a ring effect which makes the binoculars look very cool. You will also see the standard focus dial between the eyepieces to ensure it is as easy as possible to see items in the distance clearly. These binoculars are designed for children, in case the color combination didn’t already give this away. They are 8 inches wide by 6 inches long and just 2.5 inches deep. They weight 8.8 ounces which is likely to be a little heavy for very small children to carry for extended periods. In fact, the manufacturer recommends them for children between 7 and 15. While 7 is an appropriate age for these binoculars it is likely that your 15-year-old child will want something more adult looking.


This would be our favourite monocular no doubt. It is also durable, waterproof and fog proof, very intuitive to use, has a long eye-relief for use with glasses and focuses from as close as 2 meters. An excellent product by Bushnell we believe. As a more economic one, with best value for money we would recommend the Avalon 10×42 monocular which is reviewed in this post. It is a compact monocular and very light yet offers a very sharp image. Details below:
Binoculars are widely used by amateur astronomers; their wide field of view makes them useful for comet and supernova seeking (giant binoculars) and general observation (portable binoculars). Binoculars specifically geared towards astronomical viewing will have larger aperture objectives (in the 70 mm or 80 mm range) because the diameter of the objective lens increases the total amount of light captured, and therefore determines the faintest star that can be observed. Binoculars designed specifically for astronomical viewing (often 80 mm and larger) are sometimes designed without prisms in order to allow maximum light transmission. Such binoculars also usually have changeable eyepieces to vary magnification. Binoculars with high magnification and heavy weight usually require some sort of mount to stabilize the image. A magnification of 10x is generally considered the practical limit for observation with handheld binoculars. Binoculars more powerful than 15×70 require support of some type. Much larger binoculars have been made by amateur telescope makers, essentially using two refracting or reflecting astronomical telescopes.
Binoculars can be generally used without eyeglasses by myopic (near-sighted) or hyperopic (far-sighted) users simply by adjusting the focus a little further. Most manufacturers leave a little extra available focal-range beyond the infinity-stop/setting to account for this when focusing for infinity.[citation needed] People with severe astigmatism, however, may still need to use their glasses while using binoculars.
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These are built for some rough and tumble use with impact protection and a compact design to keep them safe. They’re also easy to adjust from the focus wheel to the spacing on the eyecups. With that said, the durable design is thanks to a high-quality plastic material that allows for better durability and the ware and tare of kids when out and about. This also is better peace of mind for parents that want to ensure that their child will be using a safe product that is durable.

The first thing to note when considering which monocular you will buy is magnification power. But consider the fact that stronger is not always better. The more powerful a monocular's magnification power, the harder it will be to keep it steady and in focus. If you are hoping to get a better view of objects that aren't that far away, or if you value a wider field of vision over greater range of vision, than look for a monocular with midrange magnification over one with extreme power.
In addition to the magnification and distance capabilities of the Polaris Optics Explorer, this monocular allows you to adjust the focus in order to get a clear image at a variety of distances. This flexibility makes it easy to identify your target when hunting, your birds when bird watching, etc., no matter where they are within your view. Reviewers consistently give this monocular high praise for its exceptional clarity and focus at a variety of distances.
You should be able to purchase the Kidwinz for between $30 and $40 which makes them good value for money. They arrive with an operations manual and their own nylon case. You will also find a cleaning cloth, which will be essential, and a 2-foot long neck strap. This can be easily attached to the binoculars through the loops provided. The binoculars weigh 8 ounces which will help to ensure most children can comfortably carry them all day. They measure 4.9 inches by 4.2 inches by just 2.3 inches thick. This ensures they are small enough to be comfortably held in your child’s hands. These binoculars are equipped with rubber eye surrounds. This will ensure they are comfortable when being held up to your child’s eyes; even if they wear glasses. It also prevents them from banging their eyes against the glass on the binocular and reduces the amount of light visible at source as opposed to light emitted from where they are looking at. You will also receive a high-quality carry case to help keep the binoculars safe when they are not being used. Perhaps most importantly is the fact that these binoculars are designed to withstand being dropped. They are coated in rubber to help absorb any impact; even if your child drops them on a hard floor! This is a vital feature if you are spending money on a child’s gift; they are likely to be dropped at let once by accident!
Hollywood might make you believe that only covert military operatives require night vision binoculars, but in reality, these useful devices come in handy for many situations. From scouting hunting areas to hiking after dark, investing in a good pair of night vision binoculars opens up a whole new world and allows you to see your surroundings like never before. It is also a vital safety tool for anyone that spends their time boating in the dark or indulging in some nocturnal hiking. As with any high-tech gadget, it is possible to spend a lot of money on night vision binoculars and still end up with something that will leave you dissatisfied, so doing a bit of research beforehand can save you a lot of trouble in the long run.
Zeiss is, of course, synonymous with cutting-edge optical performance, which is what you’ll be buying a pair of binos for in the first place. If you’re looking to luxuriously spend into the thousands to obtain the very best binoculars possible, then check out the Victory line up – said to be the best that Zeiss has to offer. Suitable for pretty much every pursuit, especially the watching of wildlife, the 10x magnification of our pick, the Zeiss Victory SF 10x42, not only brings the faraway up close, but the optical performance has a crystal clarity thanks in part to a seven-lens eyepiece. This particular model is also the most versatile, as well as the most premium, with an evenly balanced weight distribution and ergonomic grip making hand-holding the binos for a prolonged period a pleasure. Zeiss also claims that a large exit pupil measuring over 5mm reveals the details in dark shadows or dim dusk.
All binoculars can focus at endlessness. The actual trick in binocular design is how meticulously it can be made to keep the focus. Any birder that started out with a cheap pair of binoculars must have experienced standing 10 or 14 feet behind the remainder of the group to look at a bird that was inside their close focus ability. Multi-purpose binoculars possess a close focus around 21 to 26 feet. An outstanding birding binocular should have a close focus of 12 feet or less, with the existing close focus champ coming in at a mere 4 feet.
I’ve been birding since grade school and have spent the past 20 years working as a professional ornithologist, traveling worldwide to look for and learn about birds. I’ve published a couple dozen scientific papers and wrote Important Bird Areas of California, published in 2004 by Audubon California. Professionally, I lead birding trips for both beginners and experts, and for my “day job” I perform environmental surveys for individuals, conservation groups, corporations, and government agencies.

There's hardly a brand of binoculars out there that we don't carry. Our range of binoculars covers the whole gamut, from simple models that anyone can afford, all the way up to some of the most cutting-edge, high tech, optically perfect binoculars ever created. If you're the kind of user who knows what color fringing and chromatic aberration are - and you can't stand them - then you'll want to check out the top-of-the-line favorites from Zeiss, and Leica. If you want a tough binocular made for the outdoors that's going to give you superb clarity without smashing the piggybank, we've got solid, time-tested performers like Nikon Binoculars, Bushnell and Leupold - it's hard to go wrong with any of them. Carrying such a large array of brands allows us to offer just about every option you can think of, and we think it's safe to say that we're the best place to buy binoculars online!
If you need a monocular for more extended use such as regular hunting, bird watching or outdoors then the Vortex or Bushnell Legend Hd offers better features than the other monoculars. If you don’t mind a little extra size and weight (374 g) then the Bushnell Legend HD 10×42 would be the best choice. It has the sharpest, brightest image out of the three thanks to its better lenses. This means seeing a more detailed image, nicer colours and better low-light performance when used early mornings, at dusk, fog etc. It also has a wide field of view (6.5 wide angle) which helps spotting your subject faster and simply seeing more. Details below:
The exit pupil diameter relates to the brightness your binoculars provide. It is the measurement of the size of the ray of light that will hit your eyes after it travels through the lens. The exit pupil diameter is determined through dividing the lens size by the magnification. The larger the number that is obtained, the brighter the images will appear when viewing through the respective binoculars. Matching a higher magnification with a larger lens size ensures that you will not sacrifice on the brightness of your image.
Exit Pupil  The exit pupil is the size of the focused light that hits the eye. To see the exit pupil, hold the binocular eight to ten inches away from your face and notice the small dots of light in the center of the eyepieces. Exit pupil diameter, which should always be larger than the pupil of your eye, is directly affected by the objective diameter and the magnification. The pupil of a human eye ranges from about 1.5mm in bright conditions to about 8mm in the dark. If your binoculars’ exit pupil diameter is smaller than the pupil of your eye, it’s going to seem like you’re looking through a peep hole. Bear in mind that as eyes age, they tend to dilate less, so exit pupil becomes more important as the user ages.
The exit pupil diameter relates to the brightness your binoculars provide. It is the measurement of the size of the ray of light that will hit your eyes after it travels through the lens. The exit pupil diameter is determined through dividing the lens size by the magnification. The larger the number that is obtained, the brighter the images will appear when viewing through the respective binoculars. Matching a higher magnification with a larger lens size ensures that you will not sacrifice on the brightness of your image.

We are not familiar with this specific model but it is very likely that it was discontinued by Bushnell. This happens every year or two with optics. Right now they tend to do monoculars with power no greater than 10x. Because it is extremely difficult to achieve a stable image with a hand-held monocular stronger than that. The great magnifications were “moved” to the spotting scope products over the years. A spotting scope is normally mounted on a tripod or a table-top tripod so there is no issue with high magnifications. We only know binoculars (not monoculars) that are 16×50. The Nikon one for example: https://procular.com.au/nikon-aculon-16×50-cf-binoculars/
However, binoculars didn’t appear on the scene until the early 1800’s; there had been attempts before this but they were clumsy and not particularly good at focusing over any distance. Now binoculars are everywhere and used for a huge array of different activities. For instance, you can use them when hunting and golfing and there are even night vision goggles which combine binoculars with the ability to see at night; you can find the best 10 here.
Whilst one particular instrument did come pretty close (see my honorable mention below), I really could not look past the incredible value for money that you get with these. This is even more so now in that last year these were retailing at about $230, which I thought was incredible value, so now at their current level, these Hawke binoculars are unbeatable at this level:

The only issue we could figure with this model is that it cannot be used during the day. This is because the bright light or daylight can damage the intensifier tube of the device which would result in the binocular becoming non-usable. Some of the night vision binoculars have the feature to auto shut off these bright lights from reaching the intensifier tube and stop the damage. But this model does not have the feature. Click here to see the best price.


In this case, you need to look for monoculars with large objective lenses. These take in more light and are more suitable for night viewing (astronomy). If you need a handheld monocular for astronomy then we can suggest the Yukon 30×50 below: https://procular.com.au/yukon-scout-30×50-straight-spotting-scope/ it is a “pirate style” monocular with 30x magnification and a 50mm lens. You can use it to see the moon and near planets. Alternatively, you can also use a spotting scope mounted on a tripod. This would be more powerful and provide good views of both the night sky and distant subjects / landscape / ocean views etc. We can recommend the Basra 30-90×100 spotting scope below: https://procular.com.au/barska-30-90×100-wp-spotting-scope-tripod/
The Night Owl Explorer Pro 5X doesn’t come cheap, but if you insist on owning one of the best first generation night vision binoculars on the market then this is a very good place to start. It packs the expected 5X magnification as well as 50mm lenses. This binocular offers great image clarity thanks to the multi-element glass optics and is durable enough that it can withstand a bit of impact without crumbling. Due to the size and quality of the materials the Explorer Pro 5X also suffers from being a bit on the heavy side, but this is a small price to pay for all the features that it packs and something that you can get used to.
The Nexgen continues to impress with its 50mm lenses made from high-quality glass, durable casing, and comfortable design. About the only things that count against it are the fact that it is a bit on the heavy side and cannot be mounted on a tripod, but these are minor concerns when looking at the binoculars as a whole. With all the great features and the reasonable price, the Night Owl Pro Nexgen is easily our top pick when it comes to night vision binoculars. Additionally, 5X magnification is among the best offers you can ever get for any handheld binoculars sold at this price.

If you are looking for a monocular to use at night or complete darkness then you should consider a night vision monocular. These monoculars use a built-in IR illuminator to allow night vision capability. They normally have less magnification in order to provide a better image (less fuzzy). Night vision monoculars range in sizes, magnification and price.
They are also commonly used for studying the stars at night or for bird watching.  You may also wish to use them when camping, watching a sporting event or even at the theater. Of course, thanks to the movies, binoculars are also associated with the art of spying and this makes them exciting for children to play with! Whether they want to mimic your use of binoculars or simply pretend to be spies, this is one gift that they will enjoy and can learn from.
A step-up in price and quality will add features such as water- and fog-proofing, better optical properties, or wider fields of view. For example, the Carson Scout has a wide 62-degree viewing angle, while this Vivitar is waterproof and has an open-bridge design for easier handling. The Pentax U-Series comes in three colors (and we know how much kids love colors) and weighs less than half a pound. Perennial favorite Nikon has a great line of T01 Aculons that come in even more colors and use lead and arsenic-free glass so it’s kinder to the environment—and who doesn’t appreciate that these days?
Vortex Diamondback binoculars are of very high quality, and although the company is not as big as its competitors, it can deliver a great product. Diamondbacks come in 4 sizes: 8X28, 8X42, 10X42, and 12X50. The 10X42 pair have a 345 ft. field of view and 16 mm eye relief. These binoculars are waterproof, fog proof and have coated lenses. They weigh 24.4 ounces.
"The magnifying power of a telescope may be tested roughly by focusing the telescope on an object which contains many equally spaced lines (e.g., a marked scale or a brick wall). Looking through the telescope with one eye and observing the object directly with the other eye it is possible to determine how many divisions as seen by the unaided eye correspond to one division as seen through the telescope. This is the magnification at this observing distance."
A focusing wheel tends not to be used on top quality monoculars (with the exception of the Bushnell 10x42HD Legend) but is particularly popular on budget offerings from China. Although it makes the monocular more bulky, it does give very convenient focusing with one hand (via one finger) and is particularly fast and smooth, which is necessary in circumstances where quick, accurate changes of focus are important (e.g. bird watching in a wood).
Each product's clarity score was based on detailed observations, in varying conditions, to critically compare and rate performance. Factors that can influence clarity are objective lens size, lens material, lens coatings, and optical alignment. A larger objective lens allows more detail into the system, this has to do with the airy pattern and airy disc. ED or high-density glass corrects aberrations. This is important because a larger diameter objective lens can create more aberration issues.
What makes the Athlon Optics Midas ED binoculars great? For starters, their brightness. A lot of birding and using binoculars in general involves looking out or up at something much brighter, like the sky, or darker, such as into a dense thicket. Just as your autofocus camera can’t figure out how to illuminate something against a bright (or overcast) sky, binoculars may have difficulty mustering the light needed to brighten the distant object you’re trying to identify. Also tough is the inverse of this situation, looking into dark, dense vegetation, a situation in which you need all the light-gathering ability the binoculars can give you. The Athlon Optics Midas ED performed well on both fronts. For example, several other models tested would not allow me to differentiate throat coloration of warblers in treetops early in the morning. With the Athlons, it was almost as if the glaring, whitish background of sky wasn’t there—the colors popped to life.

We assume you are after a compact handheld monocular and not a spotting scope (i.e. tripod mounted but more powerful). If this is the case then there are a few good options. The MOST important thing to know is that there are a-lot of compact monoculars out there that are nearly impossible to use. Even if the specs look good they might have an objective sense that is too small or even worst a too narrow field of view. This makes them very hard to locate your subject with and achieve a clear image. Most 8×25 or 10×25 monoculars are simply too small for surveillance. Even 10×30 will also be too small for this. You should opt for at least 10×36 or 10×42 monoculars. This size of objective lens (36mm or 42mm) gives you a much better view than any 10×30 monocular. Note that these monoculars will still be compact, just feature a slightly larger lens. This does makes a big difference. The Avalon 10×42 monocular reviewed in the post above is a very good one as it has good power (10x) and a nice 42mm lens. It is still compact, lightweight and very durable. Details below:

The Gosky SkyView binoculars are built for astronomy use with 15x magnification and a large, 70mm objective lens that maximizes light transmission for vivid star images in low light conditions. The large roof prism and multi-coated lenses deliver bright, crisp, and clear images of all those celestial bodies. A digiscope adapter enables you to connect your smartphone to take photos and videos of what you see — it is compatible with almost all brands of smartphones on the market. The binoculars can be mounted on a tripod for steady, hands-free viewing and photo taking. The binoculars come with a carrying case, eyepiece and lens protection covers, and a cleaning cloth.
Like many of the others, these binoculars do better classify as a learning toy than actual binoculars for a child’s use. So you don’t have to worry about breaking any banks to get your child learning materials. With that said, they are well below the average price for learning binoculars, which makes them ideal for parents that want to give their kids quality binoculars.
Depth from motion – One form of depth from motion, kinetic depth perception, is determined by dynamically changing object size. As objects in motion become smaller, they appear to recede into the distance; objects in motion that appear to be getting larger seem to be coming closer. Using kinetic depth perception enables the brain to calculate time-to-crash (aka time-to-collision or time-to-contact – TTC) at a particular velocity. When driving, one is constantly judging the dynamically changing headway (TTC) by kinetic depth perception.
Another feature we deemed essential was proper functioning for users with glasses. Your binoculars work only when the proper distance between your eye and the binoculars’ ocular lens (the lens on the eyepiece end) is maintained. Glasses would increase that distance if you didn’t have a way to adjust the inboard or outboard position of the ocular lens. This feature is called eye relief, and the standard recommendation is that those who wear glasses need a minimum of 15 mm of adjustability. Old-fashioned eye relief meant a pair of rubber cups that rolled down to bring your glasses to the proper distance; those cups are still found on some binoculars, but we don’t recommend them, because they’ll eventually stiffen or even tear. Preferable are eyepieces that twist downward into a more compact position, a feature that all of our picks have.
Of the three binoculars included here, the EL is certainly the oldest. That's meant as a compliment. I don't have empirical data, but my experience with professional big game guides around the world suggests that there are nearly as many Swarovski EL binoculars in the hands of professional guides as there are all other models of binocular combined. That should tell you something about the EL's quality and durability.
Eye Relief  Eye relief is the optimal distance from the eyepiece to your eye, or the focal point where the light passes through the ocular lens (eyepiece). Manufacturers install eyecups on the eyepieces to place the user’s eyes at the proper distance from the eyepieces to make using them easy. If you wear glasses, the lenses will position the eyepieces past the eye relief distance, affecting the image quality and your ability to achieve sharp focus. Many binoculars offer dioptric adjustments on one of the eyepieces so that most users can fine-tune the focusing system to their eye prescriptions to use the binocular without their glasses. If your prescription is difficult, or you’re sharing the binocular with other users, the eyecups are often adjustable. Basic eyecups simply fold back to allow you to place your eyeglass lenses closer to the ocular lens. Another type is adjustable eyecups that twist in and out to set the proper distance for the individual user precisely.
Thanks to their compact size, however, monoculars are very convenient to carry around with you. As mentioned before, many people choose to carry a monocular with them all the time. As a result, it is easy to pull it out, use it to read a sign, identify a hunting target, or see a bird, and then put it back when you are done. There is no need for tripods, complicated set ups, or hauling extra equipment around.
Kowa have also added a material to the outer lens surfaces that protects them from dirt and dust and also makes it easier to remove the inevitable fingerprints form the glass. This is important because the easier it is to clean a lens, the far less chance you have of damaging them when doing so. Note coatings like these are only commonly found on mid to high end optics, so to see them here is impressive and a sure sign that Kowa have paid particular attention to designing a very child friendly instrument.
The Razor HD Series is available in a variety of fixed power magnifications ranging from 8×42 up to 12×50. The price difference between magnification levels is negligible and I’d probably go with the highest for increased versatility. Don’t worry. When it comes to premium grade optics, the higher magnification levels rarely compromise picture quality.
The Nikon Monarch 5 (8×42 or 10×42) are one of the best binoculars you can own for birdwatching, Safari or general use. No doubt about it. In terms of their optics, beautiful lightweight design, wide field of view and most of all image quality they are right up there with our $800-$1,000 high-end models! Therefore they have been one of the most popular choices by our more avid customers over the last 3 years. Now, regarding a monocular, if you will be using the optics often, especially for birdwatching, we wouldn’t recommend a monocular. The view is quite limiting and the design is not very comfortable to hold and stabilise for extended periods of time. It is still a great tool to carry in your bag or car and to have a “quick look” at something. But if you are viewing birds or wildlife we will always recommend binoculars. Your husband, even having only 1 eye, will find it easier to hold and use good binoculars than a monocular (again, for frequent or prolong use). The image is also significantly better since 8×42 binoculars such as the Nikon have a much wider view than a monocular – even using only the 1 eye. I have tested this theory while closing one of my eyes and using both the Nikon Monarch binoculars and the Avalon monocular. The binoculars definitely came on top!
Combining excellent optical performance with ruggedness, portability, and comfort, the Diamondback 10x42 Binoculars from Vortex Optics work for a variety of situations. The optics include fully multi-coated lenses and phase-corrected roof prisms to deliver clear images with contrast and true color. With a close focus distance of 6.7 feet, you get plenty of focus range to better see everything from faraway scenery to nearby street signs or wildlife. The combination of 10x magnification and the 42mm objective lens diameter offers you a generous 330-foot field of view. The lightweight aluminum housing is purged with argon gas and sealed with o-rings to offer fog-proof and waterproof performance. For non-slip operation, the body of the binoculars, as well as the focus ring and diopter, are all rubberized. Also included with the binoculars are a carry case, neck strap, rain guard, and tethered objective caps.
As a next step, you should look at how much magnification the monocular will give you. You want to be able to see things far away, but you should also know that there is a fine line between just enough magnification and too much magnification to be useful. For example, an extremely small mono with 10X magnification may sound nice, but it’s exceptionally hard to hold it still, no matter how good the manufacturer is. If you want a compact instrument, you are probably going to be better off with 6X or 8X, unless you look for one that includes a tripod mount (and you to use a tripod).

I’ve been birding since grade school and have spent the past 20 years working as a professional ornithologist, traveling worldwide to look for and learn about birds. I’ve published a couple dozen scientific papers and wrote Important Bird Areas of California, published in 2004 by Audubon California. Professionally, I lead birding trips for both beginners and experts, and for my “day job” I perform environmental surveys for individuals, conservation groups, corporations, and government agencies.
Accommodation – This is an oculomotor cue for depth perception. When we try to focus on distant objects, the ciliary muscles relax allowing the eye lens to flatten, making it thinner. The kinesthetic sensations of the contracting and relaxing ciliary muscles (intraocular muscles) is sent to the visual cortex where it is used for interpreting distance/depth.
Of particular relevance for low-light and astronomical viewing is the ratio between magnifying power and objective lens diameter. A lower magnification facilitates a larger field of view which is useful in viewing the Milky Way and large nebulous objects (referred to as deep sky objects) such as the nebulae and galaxies. The large (typical 7 mm using 7x50) exit pupil [objective (mm)/power] of these devices results in a small portion of the gathered light not being usable by individuals whose pupils do not sufficiently dilate. For example, the pupils of those over 50 rarely dilate over 5 mm wide. The large exit pupil also collects more light from the background sky, effectively decreasing contrast, making the detection of faint objects more difficult except perhaps in remote locations with negligible light pollution. Many astronomical objects of 8 magnitude or brighter, such as the star clusters, nebulae and galaxies listed in the Messier Catalog, are readily viewed in hand-held binoculars in the 35 to 40 mm range, as are found in many households for birding, hunting, and viewing sports events. For observing smaller star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies binocular magnification is an important factor for visibility because these objects appear tiny at typical binocular magnifications.[31]
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