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Zoom binoculars offer variable magnification and are shown as 10-30x60. In this example, 10x magnification is at the low end and 30x magnification at the high end. On most models, there will be a thumb lever or wheel placed conveniently within reach so you can adjust the magnification without changing your grip or taking the eyepieces away from your eyes. While zooms offer greater versatility, there may be a discernible degradation in image brightness and sharpness somewhere along the zoom range, since the optical path and physics of prisms will have been optimized at a single power and, as you move away from that magnification, the image quality might suffer.
That isn't to say that any of the bins we tested were poorly constructed. We didn't find any bargain basement bins that could make the cut for inclusion in our review, so all have a dcent base level of construction quality. Sure, minor things like the more plasticky rubber coating of the Celestron Nature DX or the stiff hinge of the Ahtlon Midas makes them feel a bit less engineered than other models, they can still certainly stand up to some rigorous use.

Most people who consider buying night vision binoculars or goggles do not consider the eye-cups. These are usually underestimated and overlooked. Most people only realize the importance of the eye-cups after buying a device with uncomfortable eye-cups. They are important as they are the point of contact between your face and the device. The eye-cups on the Luna Optics LN-PB3M Night Vision Binoculars are great. They are made from a type of rubber that feels like plastic. At first, this may put you off. When you place them on your face, you will realize they are a lot more comfortable than they look. In addition, the cups have ‘wings’ on their sides. These ensure external light is prevented from disrupting your view or entering from the side of your face.

I’ve peered through binoculars of different types and made by dozens of different brands over the years, and had settled on my current pair of $2,500 Leica Ultravids. After eight weeks of testing over 30 pairs of binoculars in the $150 to $350 price range (and a few that were cheaper or more expensive), I can honestly say that if my Leicas got lost tomorrow, I wouldn’t hesitate to replace them with one of our top picks.
These Gen 1 binos are a little spendy, but you’ll soon see that quality night vision binoculars typically are. The infrared illuminator enables you to see clearly even in total darkness. These are particularly useful for hunting because they are lightweight and compact. Additionally, the center focus ring is easy to maneuver and there are only two buttons to contend with — one is for turning it on/off, and the other is to activate the infrared illuminator. The ease of use is another big plus for hunters, as you need to be able to catch sight things quickly and quietly. This pair requires one 3-volt Type-123 lithium battery, which is not included. You’ll get a battery life of 40-80 hours depending on how much you use the infrared.
These binoculars feature prism lenses that can explore a 6x magnification at 21mm. They feature optical glass and rubber coated lens design that allows for a bit of light exposure allowing the child to see clearly what the image is. With that said, they are not the best-designed kids' binoculars but they are worth it for the little explorer in the family.
Next consider the time of day during which you will use your monocular. Many monoculars have amazing light gathering capabilities and work well even in darkness. Still others have actual night vision capabilities, sending out their own infrared light that can you can detect thanks to their specialized lenses. A night vision monocular is a great idea for many nature scientists or for use in tactical situations. However, most monocular that work well at night have optics that are objectively inferior in daylight. If you are primarily going to use your optical gear during the day, then you have many more options for a good monocular.
The pricier second generation binoculars are less common compared to first generation binoculars, the reason being that they are about $500 pricier than first generation devices. For the added cost, second generation binoculars come fitted with an electron amplifier known as a micro-channel plate. Abbreviated as MCP, this plate increases the light amplification power of second generation binoculars. As such, second generation devices produce sharper and brighter images.
My introduction to the Victory SF came on a lonely ridgeline somewhere on the Eastern Cape of South Africa, watching blesbuck feed across a distant slope as dusk fell and turned to dark. One by one the various binoculars our group carried became inadequate until only the SF hanging around a hunting pal's neck enabled us to see the animals. At the time I considered myself something of an optics snob and was carrying a top-tier model myself, and the SF difference was somewhat shocking.
Incidentally, one odd problem with the Nikon Monarch 5 (our pick in our previous binoculars guide) was a loud, rubber-on-rubber squeaking sound the focusing wheel often made when coming into contact with the rubber housing. I would have thought this was a random, fixable issue, but judging from online reviews, others complained about this too. The problem seems limited to individual pairs, so send yours back if they start doing this.
Trying to find the best binoculars to suit your needs? Don't be overwhelmed! We can help you figure out the difference between a roof prism binocular and a porro prism binocular. Want to know what binocular designation numbers like 8x25 and 10x42 mean? Not sure about center-focus binoculars vs. individual eyepiece focus vs. focus free binoculars? We've got you there, too. Have a look at our How To Choose Binoculars guide. Still can't choose? We've got plenty of binoculars reviews on our site as well, written by fellow users who have had experience with the same binos you're looking at. And of course, you can always contact our in-house product experts and sales staff, who can tell you more about our binoculars and help guide you to the model that's perfect for you.

Finally, this mini monocular’s molded grip makes it easy to hold. Thanks to the magnification and the grip, you will experience very little to no shaking with this device. Plus, its accessories (a carrying case, cleaning cloth, and neck strap) make it easy to use and carry with you anywhere. The result is one of the best monoculars on the market today.


Almost from the invention of the telescope in the 17th century the advantages of mounting two of them side by side for binocular vision seems to have been explored.[1] Most early binoculars used Galilean optics; that is, they used a convex objective and a concave eyepiece lens. The Galilean design has the advantage of presenting an erect image but has a narrow field of view and is not capable of very high magnification. This type of construction is still used in very cheap models and in opera glasses or theater glasses. The Galilean design is also used in low magnification binocular surgical and jewelers' loupes because they can be very short and produce an upright image without extra or unusual erecting optics, reducing expense and overall weight. They also have large exit pupils making centering less critical and the narrow field of view works well in those applications.[2] These are typically mounted on an eyeglass frame or custom-fit onto eyeglasses.


I have used a pair of Pentax binoculars for years, bringing them with me to the tops of mountains, along trails dusty, muddy, snow-bound, and everything in between, and to several different continents. Throughout all those travels, I’ve been outright rough on them. And while the Pentax U-Series Papilio IIs aren’t the most amazing binos ever made in terms of performance, it’s their durability that makes them so clutch. It has a “uni-body” design, so it has fewer moving parts and a tougher housing. And while they may look heavier than other binoculars because of that squat, thicker central body, they’re in fact quite lightweight at less than 10.5 ounces — another reason they are great for trekkers.
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