One of the features that make these binoculars impressive is the clarity you get, even when you view your surroundings with minimal ambient light. Things get even better once you switch on the IR illuminator. The quality is so good on the Pro Nexgen, you might find it hard believing that the device uses generation 1 technology. When the IR is off, you get more detail and less distance. The range is increased when IR is on although the quality tends to reduce. Since the binoculars work well without IR, you do not have to use your batteries all the time. According to the manufacturer, you can have up to 80 hours of battery life with the Nexgen. It’s important to note that the Pro Nexgen uses the CR123A battery type, which does not come cheap.

If you are looking for a gift for an older kid or simply want something a little better than all the other offerings then the Wingspan is the right option for you. However, it should be noted that this comes at a price; you can expect to pay between $100 and $130 for a pair of these binoculars. This makes them the most expensive option on our list but a worthwhile contender for the top binocular spot.
Typically, monoculars are sold with numbers like 10X47 printed on them. The first number indicates the magnification, with numbers ranging from 4 to 10 being common, but manufacturers make a wide range. Those with larger numbers have more magnification, but they usually have a smaller viewing area. The second number indicates the lenses' diameter in millimeters, with larger numbers letting in more light than those with smaller numbers.
The Ghost Hunter Night Vision binocular is one of the smallest night vision binocular in my collection of night vision binoculars. However, it can more than outperform some of its bigger competitors, especially in regards to the field of view. The Ghost Hunter has a 1X magnification and a 24 mm objective lens, which guarantee a broad field of view.
The new Monarch HG gave its top German-made competitor a close run for best overall optical quality, and most of the testers, when asked which binocular they’d choose for everyday hunting, clutched these Nikons the closest. With Field Flattener lenses that minimize distortion at the edges, the Monarch HG puts serious optical performance into a lightweight, handy package that’s highly versatile and feels ready for action. It has all the right features, including a locking diopter, a smooth and precise focus wheel, and lens covers that actually stay put. The ­exposed-metal objective rings and pebble-rubber armor also supply a cool retro vibe that we appreciated. All told, the HG hits the sweet spot for hunters who want a high-quality binocular to cover all their needs, and do it at a fair price.

Basic size (e.g. 8x30). As mentioned earlier, examples are sometimes seen where product physical dimensions or some other arbitrary figures are stated instead of magnification and objective lens diameter. This is very misleading and does not properly describe the product. Examples seen include a “40x60” in a compact monocular, where the objective lens diameter was actually 40mm (and the magnification was certainly not 40x). Another, described as "35x95", was actually a 20x40. Also, in a few cases, the overall diameter of the case surrounding the objective lens is used, rather than the lens itself, thus making it seem the objective lens is bigger than it truly is. Magnifications can also be exaggerated, an example of a claimed 16x in reality being closer to an 8x, with the number "16" probably referring to the eyepiece lens diameter. In this case, the claimed "16x52" was in reality an "8x42". Care is needed with such misleading and exaggerated specifications, more likely to be found on some very low budget items.
I ordered a pair of these for my 2 year old, and a pair of Tasco Essentials 8x21 compact binoculars for me at the same time. The Carson binoculars have better optics than most 'toy' binoculars, but they have a very narrow field of view. The Tasco's have WAY better optics, a wider field of view and they're cheaper too. My kid likes the Tasco's better and uses them more often. So far, he hasn't broken the Carson's yet. I think the Tasco's are more fragile, but he hasn't broken them yet either. The Carson's with 5x magnification seem like they barely magnify anything.
The Bushnell 260501 Equinox Night Vision is powered by 4 AA batteries. The advantage of these batteries is that they are available in local stores in most areas. The batteries are not costly and you can decide to get lithium or any other type that you deem fit. Take note the quality of batteries will affect how often you replace them. If you are going to use the device for extended periods of time, it would be advisable to carry an extra pair. People who have used the binoculars have stated that it can run for approximately 3 hours when it is using batteries. This means that you need at least two pairs if you are going to be using the binoculars for more than 3 hours. Though the device is quite pricey, its features are worth the investment.
At Night Vision Guys, we carry night vision binoculars from most key manufacturers like Armasight, ATN, NV Depot, Pulsar, Sightmark, Firefield, Night Owl and others.  Our NVB models range from the basic Gen 1 to the most advanced Gen 4 variants.  Many nv binoculars are offered with replaceable lenses to allow users to change the desired magnification by means of installing optional accessory lenses.
I've had this monocular for several months now and and I am still totally satisfied. The 42 mm objective lens allows it to gather enough light for early morning or late evening nature watching. The exit pupil measures 4 mm, which also makes this a good scope for casual star gazing. (The pupil of the human eye opens to between 5 mm and 7 mm when fully dilated. Anything more than that in a telescope is a waste.) I can get my monocular to focus as close as 28 inches. This is almost ten inches closer than a set of close focus binoculars costing hundreds of dollars more. Add to all this the coated optics, the soft rubber body, the waterproofing, the carrying case, the handy neck strap, and the tripod mount connector and one has a compelling product.
Binoculars.com is a division of Orion Telescopes & Binoculars. We offer binoculars for every viewing interest, including astronomical binoculars, compact binoculars, waterproof binoculars, birding binoculars, and sport and hunting binoculars. We offer several leading brands of binoculars, including Barska, Bushnell, Celestron, Leica, Meade, Nikon, Orion, Pentax, Steiner, and Zeiss. Not sure how to choose a binocular? Orion's Binoculars Buying Guide is a great place to start.
×