There's hardly a brand of binoculars out there that we don't carry. Our range of binoculars covers the whole gamut, from simple models that anyone can afford, all the way up to some of the most cutting-edge, high tech, optically perfect binoculars ever created. If you're the kind of user who knows what color fringing and chromatic aberration are - and you can't stand them - then you'll want to check out the top-of-the-line favorites from Zeiss, and Leica. If you want a tough binocular made for the outdoors that's going to give you superb clarity without smashing the piggybank, we've got solid, time-tested performers like Nikon Binoculars, Bushnell and Leupold - it's hard to go wrong with any of them. Carrying such a large array of brands allows us to offer just about every option you can think of, and we think it's safe to say that we're the best place to buy binoculars online!
I am shopping for a pair of good binoculars for my husband for Christmas.  We attend all of the UGA games, so this pair would be used for viewing sporting events.  Our daughter is in the marching band there, so we will also use them to follow her on the field.  I have read about the image stabilization of the Canon produts, but I am not sure if we need it?  Do you have a great pair that you would recommend for my gift?  Also, my husband wear glasses
Here it's the little things that count. The Swarovski bins are the only of the three that put thumb indents at the bottom of the barrels, and it makes a world of difference. The Swarovskis feel so much better in hand than the other models. The slightly narrower base of the Zeiss barrels made for a more comfortable hold than the Leics bins, but neither held a candle to the Swarovskis.
Very good little optic definitely very powerful and useful also compact not fogproof or waterproof as some pictures may suggest and the prism will dis-align if you bang it around too much so be careful but it is very compact and delivers crisp images at fairly far distances you can even see the moons craters pretty well with this little thing though you will need a tripod or a really steady hand though.
The latest versions incorporate an inclinometer that measures the uphill or downhill angle from you to the subject, and often have an internal computer running proprietary software and using special algorithms geared for golf or hunting can take the distance and angle (and even your cartridge and grain load), and calculate an adjusted distance for you to judge your shot, or show the click adjustment required on your scope.

One of the most common mistakes parents make when buying toys for their children is not finding the right ones for their child’s psychological age. Thus, buying a super sophisticated binocular for a two-year-old may not be the best choice considering your toddler doesn’t even speak properly. We suggest you purchase toys and especially tech products designed for children but also which fit your child’s age.
The available light from a scene enters the binoculars through the objective lenses. This light is composed of photons in all colors. The photons hit a light-sensitive surface called photocathode and are converted into electrons. A photomultiplier amplifies these electrons. On their way out, the multiplied electrons hit a phosphor screen producing flashes of light and emitting a visible image. The protons emitted are more than the ones that entered through the lens and the scene in focus appears brighter and clearer.
Well suited for watching the night sky – and in inclement weather too, as they’re not only waterproof, but nitrogen filled with it – Kowa’s YF30 series of binos offer 6x or 8x magnifications with a 30mm objective lens diameter. They offer portability in spades, weighing less than 500g each. For the sake of variety, we’ve opted for the 6x30 option here, which boasts an extremely wide viewing field of 140m at 1000m – so you’ll be able to observe a great deal without actually adjusting their position. The coated lenses are said to offer good resistance to dirt, too, making these binoculars easy to maintain. And have we mentioned that this modern interpretation of the classic porro prism optical configuration, with thick rubber armour and moulded soft contours, looks pretty damn stylish? Too stylish, in fact, to limit to use only at night.
A. It can be harder to get a clear image from binoculars with a higher magnification without the use of a tripod, monopod, or other steadying device. You’ll definitely need a steadying device for any binoculars over 20x magnification. However, some users find they need a tripod for binoculars over 12x, especially when using them for long periods of time.
A simple trick for spotting stuff faster with binoculars: Don’t hold your binoculars up to your eyes and then pan and scan for what you’re trying to spot. You’ll never get there. Instead, with the naked eye, stare up at what you want to see, then raise the binoculars to your gaze. That’ll allow whatever you’re looking at to instantly pop into your magnified view.
Incidentally, one odd problem with the Nikon Monarch 5 (our pick in our previous binoculars guide) was a loud, rubber-on-rubber squeaking sound the focusing wheel often made when coming into contact with the rubber housing. I would have thought this was a random, fixable issue, but judging from online reviews, others complained about this too. The problem seems limited to individual pairs, so send yours back if they start doing this.

This new set works fantastic. We are more careful when we share them with each other now. They are the perfect size for small hands and faces (they are for ages 3+). We love the color and the feel of them. The knob to adjust the focus is easy to turn. And they actually work well for kid binoculars, unlike some cheap ones you find other places. There is a little case that they come with and a strap to attach (so as to keep them from falling!) as well as a cleaning cloth to keep the lenses smudge free. We have had some exciting views of turkey vultures (they are so weird looking!) and neighbors' yards (prompting discussions about privacy!) We are looking forward to taking them on some nature walks and hikes.
The binoculars are well made; the main body is made of aluminum which ensures it is strong and durable. They are then coated in rubber which acts as an excellent shock absorber if your child drops them.  It is important to note that they are shockproof; this is not the same as unbreakable but they should withstand a few drops and falls. The rubber design continues to envelop the eyepiece. This provides a flexible seal to ensure your child is comfortable when looking through them without damaging their eye in the process. In addition, this blocks out any unnecessary light to provide the best possible view of anything they are looking at. These Bespin binoculars are exceptionally durable.
With that in mind I selected my top five binoculars from the initial tests and took them along with me to unfamiliar territory in southern Mexico for advanced testing. Working in the field is the ultimate test for any pair of binoculars. The optics need to do some very heavy lifting—studying intricate patterns of white vermiculation on the upper back of a woodcreeper before the bird scoots around the trunk of a tree, for example—while my brain sorts through several near-identical species, something I don’t get to do back home.
A ruby coating cuts out red light. It’s intended to stop the "fringing" effect in which some images seem to have a multi-colored halo. It also makes focusing easier. The downside is that without red light, you only see green and blue, so you don't see the proper color of things. Experts we consulted would not recommend monoculars with ruby lenses for viewing birds or wildlife.
The “act of seeing” is more a confirmation of a couple facts your brain stores, and identification becomes a result of quickly matching a minimum number of those facts with what your eyes tell you. Sure, mockingbirds have sharp, narrow bills, but that’s not usually what you look for in a distant mockingbird; you see a slender gray bird and confirm that it has black-and-white wings, and, hence, isn’t something else. Knowing that mockingbird is pretty much the only thing around with those features—and if nothing else jumps out—your identification of it as a mockingbird is instant. Your total time looking through the binoculars is maybe a second or two.
Tripod Adapters As mentioned before, binoculars with magnifications of 10x and higher are hard to hold steady, especially if they have large objectives. Large binoculars sometimes have a built-in tripod mount that makes it easy to mount them on a tripod. Sometimes a tripod adapter is required. Typically, full-sized binoculars have a plug that unscrews from the front of center hinge. The adapter screws into its place and mounts on most quick-release plates or tripods. Some tripod mounts are simply a small platform on which to lay the binocular and hold it in place with an adjustable strap.
The world has seen image stabilization in binoculars before now. A decade or so back, Canon brought us the first iteration of its IS binocular, which it continues to produce in several configurations. Nikon has an image-stabilized bino, and so does Zeiss, at the high end of the price range. All those brands developed the technology for their digital camera market, which is the origin of Fujifilm’s entry in the category: the Techno-Stabi.
However, lighter binoculars tend to be less well made and may not have enough magnification to make the experience enjoyable for your child. This is why it is important to choose binoculars which weigh 7 ounces or more if you are giving them to a child of 7 or over. Under this age, they need lighter binoculars and you will need to accept that the binoculars will only be partially effective. It will need to be viewed as an introduction to the world of binoculars.
One of the best monoculars on the market today is the Polaris Optics Explorer High Powered 12×50 Monocular. This item is one of the best monoculars in part because of its incredible magnification. One of the strongest monoculars around, it offers up to 12x magnification in a 50mm lens. This magnification gives you a clear view at up to 1,000 feet away. This range is ideal for hunters, bird watchers, sports enthusiasts, and nature lovers of all kinds.
Image quality is one of the most important features to consider since it affects how well a set will perform. The better the image quality night binoculars produce, the easier it is to spot and observe objects through it. For night vision binoculars, a lower magnification power is the best for image quality and clarity. Always check the reviews about the image clarity of the model you want. However, high image quality usually comes at a higher cost.
Hunting binoculars need to be both clearer than the hobbyist binoculars and should give you a more unobstructed view of the world in front of you. There is also a need for higher magnification, but not at the cost of picture quality. Hunting binoculars do not need to be world class because any shooting done at night will be done at relatively close range.
Though the slightly heavy design may seem inconvenient at first, the Vivitar Digicam Binoculars are well worth the effort with a 640X480 resolution on the attached camera. Add to that the 16 megabytes of internal storage and these camera binoculars become perfect for both long and short sightseeing events, from sports games to nature walks and more. Designed for comfort and precision, the Vivitar 10×25 carries a long battery life as well to ensure long-term use on almost any outing.
Below our midrange (roughly $150 to $350), the quality differences become apparent. Above our range’s higher end, you don’t necessarily get much, if any, performance advantage. Most brands we investigated tend to offer at least a couple different models of full-size (versus compact) binoculars, claim their models are waterproof (or at least water-resistant), and offer many models with a no-questions-asked lifetime and transferable return policy. Combine this with continuing improvements in glass and optical coating (or at least, a drop in manufacturing cost to the point where higher-quality lenses are now widely affordable), and we appear to be living in something of a golden age of binoculars—one birding website alone offers more than 150 models at our midrange prices.

Hits include the overlarge focus wheel, which turns easily and retains its focus. We also liked the easy-turning right-barrel diopter control and the grippy open barrels. The team had mixed perspectives on the RD’s light weight. Half felt that the weight indicated flimsy construction that could limit its durability; others felt like the weight reduction is an asset for pound-conscious backcountry hunters.

The earliest functional telescopes were designed by Dutch spectacle makers in the first years of the 17th Century. In the year 1609, Italian astronomer (and mathematician and philosopher and scientist writ large), Galileo Galilei designed an improved version of those first refracting telescopes. He pointed it skyward, becoming the first person known to have beheld a celestial object in a manner refined beyond the vision of the naked eye.
Of the several available lines, the Noctivid—a name with undertones suggesting low-light performance—is the company's flagship optic. It's available in 8x42 and 10x42. Schott HT glass does indeed offer best-in-class light transmission, coupled with sterling color purity across the complete spectrum courtesy of a new coating applied via plasma deposition, plus minimal distortion and crispness that must be seen to be believed.
It utilizes a CMOS sensor and has an onboard infrared illuminator that enables you to see when it is completely dark. Fully multi-coated lens maximizes light transmission for image quality. Its picture clarity at night is very good. During the day, you just have to turn off the IR to be able to observe well in daylight. It has a high magnification power of 7X, which is great during the day but is at the expense of image clarity for nighttime viewing. It also has a 2x digital zoom. You get a good view of your target on the large viewing screen.
While there are currently only 216 reviews on Amazon 91% of these are at 4 stars or above. Although this is not quite as high as the Kidwinz it is still an impressive figure. The main cause of issues seems to revolve around the binoculars not being as robust as expected. However, with just 10 poor reviews this is not enough to affect the overall feeling of quality these binoculars provide.
Almost from the invention of the telescope in the 17th century the advantages of mounting two of them side by side for binocular vision seems to have been explored.[1] Most early binoculars used Galilean optics; that is, they used a convex objective and a concave eyepiece lens. The Galilean design has the advantage of presenting an erect image but has a narrow field of view and is not capable of very high magnification. This type of construction is still used in very cheap models and in opera glasses or theater glasses. The Galilean design is also used in low magnification binocular surgical and jewelers' loupes because they can be very short and produce an upright image without extra or unusual erecting optics, reducing expense and overall weight. They also have large exit pupils making centering less critical and the narrow field of view works well in those applications.[2] These are typically mounted on an eyeglass frame or custom-fit onto eyeglasses.
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