Are you in search of a kid-friendly binocular that will encourage your young explorer into nature and bird watching? The Educational Insights GeoSafari Jr. Kidnoculars is a nice piece that is specifically made for toddlers and kids. The binocular encourages fun, exploration and it is built to last. No need to worry when your kid drops it down because it is kid-tough. This kid-friendly binocular is designed with large and comfy eye-pieces to suit little users.
Since you're not looking at really far distance, I don't think you need anything more than 6x or 7x...this lower power will bring the subject in close while maintaining a wide field of view. If you need  more power, I wouldn't go any higher than 8x. Also, depending on the objective lens diameter you go with, keeping the power to the 6-7x range you'll also benefit from a wide exit pupil and (generally) longer eye relief.
The reviews of these binoculars are generally good. There are currently 169 reviews on Amazon and 84% of these give it a 4 or 5-star rating. The general feedback is that the binoculars really do work and provide an opportunity for children to really start exploring the world around them. Of course, there are always some less positive comments but these revolve around items breaking on the binoculars and the fact they don’t see as well as adult binoculars, which should be obvious from the price and description of these binoculars.
For young grade-schoolers, the view becomes important. These kids will have trouble getting their binoculars on birds, so it is very important to have a wide field of view. They will also have a hard time keeping the binoculars steady, so a large exit pupil will help them keep the image centered over their eyes. Look for low power compact binoculars of reverse porro prism construction.

This new optic from Bushnell has those two in-line hinges, but it’s 50 percent larger than most binoculars in the compact class, weighing just over 13 ounces. That’s a good thing, since size matters in glassing, and hand-filling heft is usually better than the alternative. Before getting into its attributes, a few complaints: The 10X magnification is better suited to larger-frame binoculars; the better magnification for this size is 8X. Second, the focus control is about 50 percent too small. And the 2-position eyecups are sloppy.
Backyard Safari Field Binoculars are a great inexpensive option for young explorers. They aren’t the most powerful kids binoculars, but they will make your next backyard safari more exciting for your little one. Perfectly sized for kids’ hands and face, the also have rubberized hand grips that make them easy to hold and rubber eye cups for safety. They are durable and have the added bonus of being waterproof.
We were heading for South Africa and wanted a pair of night binoculars where I could see the animals at night. I was certainly not disappointed in the performance of these night vision binoculars. If you have been shopping for a set of night vision binoculars' you have already noticed how expensive they can be and may be thinking about opting for a single telescope type rather than binoculars.
The “42” in our 10x42 binocular refers to the diameter of the objective (front) lens in millimeters. Since the objectives will often be the largest portion of the optic, it will affect the overall size and weight of the binocular, and how much light it can gather. In basic terms: larger objectives allow more light to pass through them than smaller lenses, which means images will appear brighter, sharper, and clearer. However, the larger objectives will also add bulk and weight, and that is where certain tradeoffs and compromises need to be considered when deciding if certain models will be convenient to carry, pack, hold, and use comfortably.
I have used a pair of Pentax binoculars for years, bringing them with me to the tops of mountains, along trails dusty, muddy, snow-bound, and everything in between, and to several different continents. Throughout all those travels, I’ve been outright rough on them. And while the Pentax U-Series Papilio IIs aren’t the most amazing binos ever made in terms of performance, it’s their durability that makes them so clutch. It has a “uni-body” design, so it has fewer moving parts and a tougher housing. And while they may look heavier than other binoculars because of that squat, thicker central body, they’re in fact quite lightweight at less than 10.5 ounces — another reason they are great for trekkers.
Peripheral vision – At the outer extremes of the visual field, parallel lines become curved, as in a photo taken through a fish-eye lens. This effect, although usually eliminated from both art and photos by the cropping or framing of a picture, greatly enhances the viewer's sense of being positioned within a real, three-dimensional space. (Classical perspective has no use for this "distortion", although in fact the "distortions" strictly obey optical laws and provide perfectly valid visual information, just as classical perspective does for the part of the field of vision that falls within its frame.)
Typically, monoculars are sold with numbers like 10X47 printed on them. The first number indicates the magnification, with numbers ranging from 4 to 10 being common, but manufacturers make a wide range. Those with larger numbers have more magnification, but they usually have a smaller viewing area. The second number indicates the lenses' diameter in millimeters, with larger numbers letting in more light than those with smaller numbers.
Order for my husband for Christmas wasn't sure what all the technical jargon was about but when they came in I tried them out first lol well I could see much further than expected I live on the atchafalaya river I am guessing it's at least a 1/2 mile from my house to across the river non obstructive view and it lit up the opposite river back as much as my back yard I couldn't believe I could see that far I expected to see just my back yard which approx the length of a football field from my house to the river and the river is approx 2 football fields across so that 3 football fields that's my best guess lol but you get the idea you can see crystal clear a long way!!! I think I'll have more fun watching deer than he will watching coyote
Hi Betty, a monocular is a great little tool when you need to inspect something at a distance. As it is compact and easy to carry around everywhere + it can provide the same power as binoculars (8x in your case which is standard magnification). Other people have difficulties looking through both eyes so a monocular works well for them. The downside with a monocular though is that it has a significatly narrower field of view than binoculars – because it only has one lens of course. So if you are on an African Safari you will benefit MUCH more from using a pair of binoculars. Because there is a-lot to see in the field. On a Safari trip, or during any wildlife or birdwatching observation for that matter, you are not always pointing at a specific subject. Many times you will need to first find the subject and follow it. For that reason binoculars work best. As your tour leader suggested 8×42 would be ideal for Safari. You can read more about choosing Safari binoculars and see our most recommended models here: https://procular.com.au/best-safari-binoculars-the-complete-guide/
They are a little heavy, weighing in at 38 ounces, however we quickly brushed this aside as we could see wild animals in the bush. From the naked eye the animals could not be seen at all. The constriction of the binoculars appears to be very good. The company claims these binoculars to be the most advanced and most highly acclaimed night vision binoculars in the industry.

If you love bird watching, you can engage your kids too by buying them the best kids binoculars. With the right optics, your kids will enjoy a great experience outdoors, and they end up learning more. I know you do not want to invest heavily buying the best children binocular, the Bushnell Falcon 133410 is an affordable model that your child can carry anywhere. The binocular is great and perfect for sporting events and sighting outings.
The only porro-prism binocular in this year’s test, the ShadowQuest is made to perform a very specific task: to help you methodically pick apart the landscape and find distant critters at the very edges of daylight. And it does a heck of a job of it. This was the only binocular to notch a perfect score for low-light performance, and it also finished near the top in resolution. What’s more, no amount of soaking, freezing, or thawing significantly obscured the image. It has ­individual-​eyepiece focusing, so you can’t refocus quickly, but that’s not what the ShadowQuest is made for. You get yourself a good vantage point, you set the focus (which will then be sharp from 20 yards to infinity), and then you start searching this binocular’s huge field of view to spot animals you might well miss with other models.
Of the three binoculars included here, the EL is certainly the oldest. That's meant as a compliment. I don't have empirical data, but my experience with professional big game guides around the world suggests that there are nearly as many Swarovski EL binoculars in the hands of professional guides as there are all other models of binocular combined. That should tell you something about the EL's quality and durability.
Travis Pike is a Marine infantry veteran, firearms enthusiast, and NRA certified instructor. He’s a lifelong shooter who just happened to be mediocre enough with a gun and a keyboard to combine the two and write. He currently teaches concealed carry courses and enjoys spending time in Florida’s Nature Coast. He is interested in helping folks protect themselves with firearms and shoot better at the range.

Unlike some of the other binoculars aimed for kids, these are much smaller and more compact in design so they can be easily transported while out hiking or hunting. This also makes them pretty durable with some impact ratings and non-slip scratch. Other than that, parents will love the durability aspect of the binoculars, with a good grip design and many color choices to choose from.
The ability to quickly and accurately focus on an object can be the difference between seeing that rare bird and hearing about it. Can you maintain accurate focus or will you accidentally offset the diopter, giving you a blurry image? For the ease of adjustment category, we looked at the following items: how quickly one can focus from one spectrum to the other, how easy it is to focus on an object to get the most detail, and how easy it was to adjust the diopter and did the diopter lock. We also evaluated the interpupillary distance adjustment. Except for the locking diopter, the criteria was a subjective and based solely on several testers' opinions.
For pre-teens, it is time to consider their first pair of "real" binoculars -- that is, optical quality starts to matter. If your child is serious about birding, you should start to think about the US$75-US$150 entry-level birding binoculars from the major manufacturers, but still look for toggle focus rather than wheel focus, 7x to 8x magnification, and wide field of view.

More and more people are turning to night vision goggles for their night vision needs, but there are still some solid binos out there. If you’re shopping for the best night vision binocular, I’m sure that you know there are a wide variety of great brands and offers out there. In fact, you may be reading this article because you’re slightly overwhelmed over what’s on the market!
The easiest way to tell if your binocular employs BAK4 or BK7 is to turn it around, hold it 6 to 8" away from you and look down the objective and observe the exit pupil. If you can see a squared-off side to the general roundness of the image, the binoculars have BK7 prisms. BAK4 prisms show a truer round exit pupil, which translates to better light transmission and edge-to-edge sharpness.

The reviews of these binoculars are generally good. There are currently 169 reviews on Amazon and 84% of these give it a 4 or 5-star rating. The general feedback is that the binoculars really do work and provide an opportunity for children to really start exploring the world around them. Of course, there are always some less positive comments but these revolve around items breaking on the binoculars and the fact they don’t see as well as adult binoculars, which should be obvious from the price and description of these binoculars.


If you want nighttime binoculars strictly for use in pitch darkness, these are the best night vision binoculars for you. Night Owl specializes in night vision equipment. You can always expect great quality and performance from them. With this Pro Nexgen, Night Owl wanted to offer the most advanced gen-1 night vision binoculars in the industry with high-quality aesthetics, ergonomics, performance, and long battery life.
The fact is that this kind of toys are an excellent learning tool. All scientific education aside, they’re also just a fun gift that will last for a long time and never gets boring, because what’s on the other side of them is constantly changing. They’re a great investment of money for a growing child and can be used by all members of the family. Portability is also an included asset when it comes to this kind of toys because they’re useful no matter where you go. If you do happen to be a family of hikers and campers, they really are a must-have for exploring. They set the tone for adventure and can be so useful when it comes to seeing what’s out there since they’re essentially just visual boosters!
Also be aware, however, that the biggest monocular with the biggest magnification is not always the best choice. You must balance the optics against other features. For example, magnifications of 6 and 7 are often better for compact monoculars, because larger magnifications create shakiness in such a small device. Plus, compact monoculars will, by nature, have smaller lenses. Even larger monoculars with smaller lenses or magnifications can serve you well if they come with features such as multi-coated optics to maximize the clarity of the light coming through the lenses.
When you’re jostling for space in the stands at a sporting event, getting out a huge pair of binos with long lenses isn’t going to endear you to anyone. Much more practical are Bushnell’s low 4x magnification Spectator Sport binoculars that, while being affordable, also feature the bells and whistles of multi-coated optics to increase light transmission and brightness, plus are nitrogen filled to avoid fogging during changes in humidity or temperature. The ace in the pack here, though, is that manufacturer Bushnell claims that the massive 900ft field of view these binos provide is the closest you’ll get to a panoramic experience – so you’ll be able to comfortably track the sporting action, no matter where on the track or field it’s taking place. A winner.
Though the slightly heavy design may seem inconvenient at first, the Vivitar Digicam Binoculars are well worth the effort with a 640X480 resolution on the attached camera. Add to that the 16 megabytes of internal storage and these camera binoculars become perfect for both long and short sightseeing events, from sports games to nature walks and more. Designed for comfort and precision, the Vivitar 10×25 carries a long battery life as well to ensure long-term use on almost any outing.
Simply stated, binoculars use a series of lenses, elements, and prisms to produce a magnified view of distant people, places, or things. Using two parallel optical tubes allows you to observe with both eyes open, which is more comfortable and natural than using a spotting scope or telescope—which requires you to keep one eye closed. Additionally, having both eyes open maintains your depth of field and provides you with a rich and immersive experience where the scene takes on a more lifelike, 3-D appearance.
There is an adage that goes "the best pair of binoculars is the one you use." If yours aren't comfortable to hold, carry, or look through then you aren't going to use them. Things like rubberized coatings on the barrels, indentations for your hands and thumbs, an open bridge, comfortable interpupillary distance, padded straps, adjustable eyecups, weight, size, and eye relief can all affect how comfortable a pair will be. All of these measurements are very subjective and will differ between individuals. For instance, not everyone's eyes are set the same distance apart, so everyone will be most comfortable with a slightly different interpupillary distance. The amount of eye relief can be a big concern for someone with glasses and of little concern to others.

Like many of the others, these binoculars do better classify as a learning toy than actual binoculars for a child’s use. So you don’t have to worry about breaking any banks to get your child learning materials. With that said, they are well below the average price for learning binoculars, which makes them ideal for parents that want to give their kids quality binoculars.
What makes the Athlon Optics Midas ED binoculars great? For starters, their brightness. A lot of birding and using binoculars in general involves looking out or up at something much brighter, like the sky, or darker, such as into a dense thicket. Just as your autofocus camera can’t figure out how to illuminate something against a bright (or overcast) sky, binoculars may have difficulty mustering the light needed to brighten the distant object you’re trying to identify. Also tough is the inverse of this situation, looking into dark, dense vegetation, a situation in which you need all the light-gathering ability the binoculars can give you. The Athlon Optics Midas ED performed well on both fronts. For example, several other models tested would not allow me to differentiate throat coloration of warblers in treetops early in the morning. With the Athlons, it was almost as if the glaring, whitish background of sky wasn’t there—the colors popped to life.
Yes, a monocular would definitely work in this case. You do not need to much magnification for looking up a tree and since you are looking at a very small area (termite nest) you would benefit from a monocular’s narrower field of view. The Avalon 10×42 is a good choice as it is compact, very rugged and has a-lot of light intake due to its larger 42mm lens.
I ordered this for my 2 1/2 year old grandson. We keep it on the windowsill, right next to Grandma and Grandpa's his and her binoculars. We all watch the birds in our backyard together. They are adjustable to the width of the eyes, so they can be used by almost any size toddler. We are having to teach our grandson to not press the binoculars into his eyes, but rather to look through the lens. lol. We must supervise his use of them now, but he will get the hang of it. Great buy for the price.
This is a worthy addition to Leica’s venerable Geovid line. The biggest update is a faster, more powerful laser that reaches out to 3,000 yards (though in practical terms, 2,000 yards is a more realistic expectation) and works in concert with a ballistics calculator that contains profiles for 12 standard loads. Users also have the option of uploading custom ballistics through a micro-SD port. No matter the data source, the nearly instantaneous readout gives users a shooting solution based on holdover, click adjustment, or incline-adjusted range informed by the onboard environmental sensors, including temperature, barometric pressure, and angle.
The “act of seeing” is more a confirmation of a couple facts your brain stores, and identification becomes a result of quickly matching a minimum number of those facts with what your eyes tell you. Sure, mockingbirds have sharp, narrow bills, but that’s not usually what you look for in a distant mockingbird; you see a slender gray bird and confirm that it has black-and-white wings, and, hence, isn’t something else. Knowing that mockingbird is pretty much the only thing around with those features—and if nothing else jumps out—your identification of it as a mockingbird is instant. Your total time looking through the binoculars is maybe a second or two.

For bird watching or to observe sporting events, look for models with 7-12x magnification. These have fields of view wide enough to enjoy fast-moving action. Higher magnifications, such as those on astronomy binoculars and spotting scopes, narrow your field of view but show faraway subjects in detail. Zoom binoculars have a unique design that allows adjustable magnification. A 10-22x50 model has 55mm objective lenses with a minimum magnification of 10x and a maximum magnification of 22x. Spotting and riflescopes are popular magnifying instruments with this feature.
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