I would like to draw your attention to the Tom Lock 10x42 Series 2 binocular, that ran the Carson very close and with a BBR score of 70%, would have been right up there with last years winner and which is why I feel that they are well worth a mention and urge you to take a closer look at if you are after a slightly higher powered, but low cost 10x device.

Finding the most suitable alternative for creative and exciting toys for children can be a little hard, especially since there are so many options on the market. A good pair of kids binoculars will certainly bring interest and even motivate your child to learn more, be more curious and even develop new passions or hobbies. Here are the main features we consider these items should have.


There are two other focusing types that need to be addressed: individual and focus-free. The individual focus models eliminate the center-focusing mechanism to give each eyepiece the ability to focus independently. While this allows for extremely fine and precise focusing, they are often frustrating to use when sharing and should only be considered if there will only be one primary user. Many marine and astronomical models feature this system. Focus-free binoculars don’t have any focusing mechanisms. They rely on your eyes to focus the image, allowing you to concentrate on the scenery and enjoy the views. Some users with exceptionally poor eyesight or weak eyes should probably steer clear of focus-free models because they put a lot of stress on the eye and can cause discomfort such as eye strain or headaches.
Zoom is sometimes stated where there is no zoom facility. Zoom means a variable magnification facility, as often seen on cameras, for example. The term "zoom" or misleading phrases like "power zoom" or "mega zoom" are used incorrectly when referring to a single magnification optic. Zoom values will always be two numbers separated by a hyphen (e.g. 8-20) and then followed by the objective lens diameter (e.g. 8-20x50). As mentioned elsewhere in this entry, a true zoom facility can be seen on some budget monoculars but with very significant optical limitations.
Many people will tell you that $300 is the magic number when it comes to binoculars, and there is some truth to this. $300 is the price range where you first start seeing truly good lowlight performance. If you're willing to spend this much on a pair of bins, we highly recommend the Nikon Monarch 5 8x42. These bins offer the best clarity we've seen in this price range. They also offer a nice, smooth focus knob that lets even beginners lock in a clear image quickly and easily. The cherry on top is the brightness, which allows for a good image even in suboptimal lighting conditions. So if your birding hobby grows into an obsession that finds you setting the alarm for 3:30am just to catch a glance at a migrating Grosbeak, these binoculars will be able to keep up with you.

The built-in IR illuminator protrudes out of the body’s front and is located between the two barrels. The illuminator allows you to use the device in situations where the ambient light is not sufficient or when there is complete darkness. The illuminator emits infrared light reflecting it from the object you wish to view. The light is then amplified by the tube in a similar way ambient light is amplified. Next to the illuminator is the sensors which protect the gadget from damage that might arise from exposing the sensitive internal components to bright light. Additionally, the Luna Optics 3X42 Premium Night Vision Binoculars are weather resistant. However, this does not mean they are fog or waterproof. You should take this into consideration if you plan on using the device in extreme weather conditions.
The most important feature of any pair of binoculars is its ability to offer a clear and precise view of very distant objects. In that spirit, a lot of manufacturers will describe their binoculars by using phrases like, "long-range view," "adjustable focus," and "superior magnification." More often than not, a pair of binoculars can be refocused by rotating a thumbscrew in the center of the bridge. There are certain digital models on the market, however, that will allow users to adjust the focus via the touch of a button.
So how do you pick the right binoculars? Well, as you might already know, binoculars are classified by a couple of numbers: firstly their magnification, followed by the (objective) lens size. For example: 10x30. If you’re looking for general-purpose travel binoculars for hand-held use, then a model with up to a 8x or 10x magnification should be fine. Go for a higher magnification and any handshake will be magnified too, making for a shaky image – unless there is the ability to mount them onto a tripod, or they have built-in image stabilisation.
One of the features that make this particular product unique is its capability to record videos as well as take pictures. Not many gadgets or devices in the market out there have a similar capability. It is, therefore, a great feature to have in a binocular. Most other binoculars that support video are not very clear. It is common to experience blurs when viewing things in motion when you are using standard binoculars. Such problems will not be experienced when you are using the Sniper Deluxe Night Vision Binoculars. Video technology in the gadget ensures you can comfortably record any moving objects in the dark or during the day.
The first thing to look at when choosing a monocular is its power or magnification. A monocular will typically have a magnification of 6x to 10x – higher magnification will allow you to see further and in more detail. 9x or 10x monoculars will usually cost a bit more than 6x or 8x ones. The good thing about a monocular is that you get the same power of binoculars with only half of their size.
Thermal imaging monoculars are another type of night vision monocular. They work by detecting the heat emitted by people, animals, and other objects. They then use this heat to develop a picture of the objects in the dark. One of the benefits of this type of monocular is that you can use it both during the day and at night, instead of needing to switch modes as you do with an infrared monocular.
Today, there are many reasons for why a person might want to extend his or her vision out across a great distance. With the right optical hardware, one can enjoy a better view of a sporting event, concert, or a parade. Enhanced long distance vision is important for bird watching and other nature activities, or for hunting, too. In a tactical situation, such as a police stakeout or combat scenario, the better one can see from farther away, the safer they and the team remain and the better they can control the unfolding events.

A lot of the discussion on the general internet tends to be one brand against another with very little reason as to why. Also most forum users only own one pair, so it very much becomes a sample-of-one. Your atricle puts all the main concepts together allowing the prospective buyer to at least understand all the jargon and also filtering out the marketing gumf which so often misleads (aircraft-grade, being a prime example).
Bushnell is a well-known name in the binocular market. Even better? They have spectacular night vision binoculars! This company has been in business for over 65 years. Their expertise is in providing the best optics products for any outdoor or sporting occasion. These excursions include fishing, hunting, stargazing, golf, bird watching, the study of nature and much more. They even create binoculars for indoor activities such as viewing the opera or watching the car race.

Compact binoculars are essentially scaled-down versions of full-size binoculars, with similar rubberized construction to protect against impacts, waterproof seals, a central focusing knob, twisting eyecups, and foldable hinges—yet they are about half the size and weight (around 10 ounces vs. 25 ounces or more). Because the lenses are narrower, the field of view (how wide an area you see while looking through them) is reduced compared with that of any full-size model. But, particularly if you have neck/shoulder pain or don’t mind sacrificing a little optical performance for the ease of packing them in a pocket or tote bag, they’re a solid choice for “light” birding, butterfly-watching, or botanizing. They’re also ideal for mountain biking or backpacking, when you may want to look at a couple things on the trip, but they’re not constantly in use.
The actual field of view is the angle of your viewing window at the point after the binocular lenses. If you have a pair of 10X binoculars, and your actual field of view is 5 degrees, then your apparent field of view will be 50 degrees. You simply multiply the actual field of view measurement by the magnification of your binoculars in order to get the apparent field of view.
Below our midrange (roughly $150 to $350), the quality differences become apparent. Above our range’s higher end, you don’t necessarily get much, if any, performance advantage. Most brands we investigated tend to offer at least a couple different models of full-size (versus compact) binoculars, claim their models are waterproof (or at least water-resistant), and offer many models with a no-questions-asked lifetime and transferable return policy. Combine this with continuing improvements in glass and optical coating (or at least, a drop in manufacturing cost to the point where higher-quality lenses are now widely affordable), and we appear to be living in something of a golden age of binoculars—one birding website alone offers more than 150 models at our midrange prices.
The Night Owl Explorer comes with 5x magnification. That means one thing: a powerful view. To be exact, it has a 700 field of view and a 575 range of view. That’s remarkable for sight seeing and observing. With the built in infrared illuminators, you’re able to view the wildlife animals in absolute, complete darkness. The moon could be hidden from the night sky and you would be able to see what is many yards ahead of you. It has a steel stringer system that gives you additional control and precision over the binoculars.
The Razor HD is argon-filled and sealed with O-rings to ensure reliable and durable protection against dust, debris, fog and water. It is rubber armored for non-slip and durable protection, and is equipped with a large focusing knob that is easy to use even while wearing gloves. Naturally contoured to perfectly fit your hands, promoting comfort and eliminating user-fatigue Vortex has once again created a winning combination of features.
Monopsia is a medical condition in humans who cannot perceive three-dimensionally even though their two eyes are medically normal, healthy, and spaced apart in a normal way. Vision that perceives three-dimensional depth requires more than parallax. In addition, the resolution of the two disparate images, though highly similar, must be simultaneous, subconscious, and complete. (After-images and "phantom" images are symptoms of incomplete visual resolution, even though the eyes themselves exhibit remarkable acuity.) A feature article in The New Yorker magazine published in early 2006 dealt with one individual in particular, who, learning to cope with her disability, eventually learned how to see three-dimensional depth in her daily life. Medical tests are available for determining monoptic conditions in humans.[2]
Zooming is a crucial feature in any binocular. The amount of zooming a binocular allows will determine its effectiveness. 2X zooming is the common standard for most binoculars in the market, including the Sniper Digital Deluxe Night Vision Binocular. The zoom is digital which allows the user to get the best view possible. The user can also adjust the zoom anytime at the touch of a button.

(Close your right eye and sight an object with your left eye, focus the binocular by rotating the center focus wheel until the image is sharp and clear. Field of vision: 96m/1000m 20x. Open your right eye and close your left eye, rotate the right eyepiece until the object sighted is sharp and clear(Note the setting of the diopter scale for later use).


A monocular is designed to be very compact and portable. Larger monoculars with more power, bigger lenses and wider views are called spotting scopes. A spotting scope will be significantly bigger and heavier than a monocular. These are often used for hunting, bird watching or spotting subjects from a fixed location. So if you need better performance and don’t mind the size or weight, then you should consider getting a spotting scope.
Thanks to their compact size, however, monoculars are very convenient to carry around with you. As mentioned before, many people choose to carry a monocular with them all the time. As a result, it is easy to pull it out, use it to read a sign, identify a hunting target, or see a bird, and then put it back when you are done. There is no need for tripods, complicated set ups, or hauling extra equipment around.
The coating on a lens has almost as much to do with clarity and brightness as the lenses themselves. A good coating can reduce the amount of scattered light down to a quarter of a percent per a surface. Scattered light is lost or misaligned information. You can have the best lens and coatings, but if all the elements aren't lined up and centered your image will come out distorted. With a minimum of 6 elements and some models having up to 20 elements, plus the two barrels, getting everything aligned can be very difficult. Fortunately, our brains are good at compensating for small misalignments. However, misalignments can add to eye strain.
"The magnifying power of a telescope may be tested roughly by focusing the telescope on an object which contains many equally spaced lines (e.g., a marked scale or a brick wall). Looking through the telescope with one eye and observing the object directly with the other eye it is possible to determine how many divisions as seen by the unaided eye correspond to one division as seen through the telescope. This is the magnification at this observing distance."
When you bring this binocular to your eyes, the world looks like a better place. They’re that good. With perfect scores in build and ergonomics, resolution, and image quality, the Noctivid is what you get when you combine German glass, precision engineering, and few, if any, limits on production costs. All the moving parts—eyecups, focus wheel, and locking center-dial diopter control—are smooth and positive. The plasma-coated Schott glass delivers a stunning picture with eye-popping detail. At $2,700, the Noctivid got low marks for value. But surprisingly, the binocular also fell down on weather resistance, showing condensation inside the right barrel that lingered for days. Leica says that this is highly unusual and would be covered under warranty, but still, we had to ding it.
In aprismatic binoculars with Keplerian optics (which were sometimes called "twin telescopes") each tube has one or two additional lenses (relay lens) between the objective and the ocular. These lenses are used to erect the image. The binoculars with erecting lenses had a serious disadvantage: they are too long. Such binoculars were popular in the 1800s (for example, G.& S. Merz models), but became obsolete shortly after the Karl Zeiss company introduced improved prism binoculars in the 1890s.[3]
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